EU hails resuming of Cyprus reunification talks

  

EU leaders welcomed today (11 February) the resuming of peace talks in divided Cyprus, in a fresh attempt to end one of Europe's most enduring conflicts and a decades-old obstacle to Turkey's hopes of joining the European Union.

EU welcomes Cyprus reunification talks

Leaders of the island's rival Greeks and Turks are due to meet in no-mans-land, at an airport compound in the capital Nicosia that was abandoned in past fighting and is now used as a base for the United Nations peacekeeping force. It will be their first formal encounter for almost 18 months.

Nicos Anastasiades, president of the internationally recognised Cypriot government, and Turkish Cypriot leader Derviş Eroğlu will mandate a U.N. envoy to read out a joint statement outlining the basic principles that should govern a settlement.

They will then leave their aides to negotiate the minutiae of any deal in a process which could take months, aimed at healing the split between the two sides caused by war in 1974.

"I do not only wish [Tuesday] will be the start of a process which yields results, but I am also vowing that I will work towards this," Kudret Ozersay, the Turkish Cypriot chief negotiator, said on Twitter.

The President of the European Commission José Manuel Barroso, and the President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy issued a statement, welcoming the agreement by the leaders of the two communities to resume talks.

The European Commission is keen to play its part in supporting the negotiations, conducted under UN auspices and to offer all the support the parties and the UN find most useful, the statement reads.

Accordingly, Barroso will send a personal representative, and in parallel, the European Commission will step up efforts to help the Turkish Cypriot Community prepare for implementation of the acquis. Although the entire island of Cyprus is considered EU territory, EU legislation doesn’t apply on the Turkish-controlled North, which doesn’t benefit either from EU funds.

Cyprus's partition is a headache for the European Union. The island is represented in the EU by its Greek Cypriots, with veto-wielding rights over Turkey's wish to join the bloc.

Turkey invaded Cyprus's north in 1974 after a Greek inspired coup. It provides political and financial support to a breakaway Turkish Cypriot state there.

Direction

Endless rounds of talks have failed to make headway on attempts to unite Cyprus as a union of two autonomous regions with one central government.

"It's a good text ... it certainly helps set the direction [of talks] and that can only be a good thing," one diplomat told Reuters, referring to the joint statement outlining the principles of a deal.

But a junior partner in Anastasiades's centre-right coalition, the centrist Democratic Party, says the text is unbalanced in Turkey's favour and has said it could quit the government over the issue.

"The Turkish side achieves most of its long-standing ambitions, before talks have even started," said party Chairman Nicholas Papadopoulos, son of the late Tassos Papadopoulos, a former president who rejected a U.N. reunification blueprint in 2004.

The threat is to a government which brokered a painful international bailout last year, staving off bankruptcy, and it could complicate an EU and IMF-directed economic reform programme that Cyprus has undertaken in return for 10 billion in aid.

Analysts, however, said the impact to the bailout if the party did quit the government would be minimal.

"If they do quit the coalition they won't mess up the MOU too much," said British economist Fiona Mullen, referring to the economic adjustment programme. "Because [if they did] they will get blamed for the collapse of the economy."

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Comments

Dimitrios's picture

Any reunification that presupposes a union of two defacto states, equal in every respect, toward a federation is a recognition and acceptance of Turkish aggression.

Prior to the Turkish invasion, Cyprus was a homogeneous physical entity of Greek and Turkish Cypriots.

As such, there is no reason why a reunification cannot exist without internal subdivisions of statehood. Sure, any proportional representation in politics in the like can be subject for discussion and agreement.

Cyprus should remain an undivided physical territory available to all Cypriots and its subjects afforded the same rights and privileges. That would be the true essence of unification and reconciliation.

Without an absolute commitment by both sides to live together harmoniously, there is little point to bring the two communities together in a federation. In this instance, perhaps the Greek Cypriots can renegotiate the demarcation line to one the better reflects the community presence as it was in 1974 (ie, The Turkish Cypriots reduce their occupied territory to about 20%).

Dimitrios's picture

Post Script:

An alternative to full reunification without subdivisions, is to have a constitutionally agreed temporary federation of two separate states that phases into one state at a predetermined time frame (that is, after a period of 10 years).

The longer term objective should be assimilation to pre 1974 divisions, with equitable balance of power, rather than partition and loose unification of separate entities.

If I were a Greek Cypriot, I would be prepared to live with the Turkish Cypriots in one state so long as this state was indivisible and home to us both. At least, this way, it would be more palatable for my children to intermingle and inter-marry with children of Turkish Cypriot extraction. In the absence of an indivisible territory, then I think I would rather live within my Greek Cypriot community and continue the inter generational transmission of my culture and identity with my fellow Greek Cypriots.

Dimitrios's picture

Post Script:

An alternative to full reunification without subdivisions, is to have a constitutionally agreed temporary federation of two separate states that phases into one state at a predetermined time frame (that is, after a period of 10 years).

The longer term objective should be assimilation to pre 1974 divisions, with equitable balance of power, rather than partition and loose unification of separate entities.

If I were a Greek Cypriot, I would be prepared to live with the Turkish Cypriots in one state so long as this state was indivisible and home to us both. At least, this way, it would be more palatable for my children to intermingle and inter-marry with children of Turkish Cypriot extraction. In the absence of an indivisible territory, then I think I would rather live within my Greek Cypriot community and continue the inter generational transmission of my culture and identity with my fellow Greek Cypriots.

Dimitrios's picture

Post Script:

An alternative to full reunification without subdivisions, is to have a constitutionally agreed temporary federation of two separate states that phases into one state at a predetermined time frame (that is, after a period of 10 years).

The longer term objective should be assimilation to pre 1974 divisions, with equitable balance of power, rather than partition and loose unification of separate entities.

If I were a Greek Cypriot, I would be prepared to live with the Turkish Cypriots in one state so long as this state was indivisible and home to us both. At least, this way, it would be more palatable for my children to intermingle and inter-marry with children of Turkish Cypriot extraction. In the absence of an indivisible territory, then I think I would rather live within my Greek Cypriot community and continue the inter generational transmission of my culture and identity with my fellow Greek Cypriots.

erc an's picture

isn't it the greek cypriot party who failed with the pre 1974 divisions, when they attempted to annex the whole of island with greece and killed turkish&greek cypriots and brits in their fight?
isn't it the greek cypriot party who during early 60s stripped off rights of turkish cypriots that were given in supreme law at the independence of the island from britain?
this is "why a reunification cannot exist without internal subdivisions of statehood" - in your words.

e r c's picture

it is a funny thing you refer to the turkish aggression, while the following facts are recorded at present and in history:
* british military base in island used for logistics in control of eastern mediteranean and middle east
* american base like above
* french military presence in greek side
* threat of placing russian missiles into island by greek-cypriot site every time greek-cypriot politicians are unhappy about how the western allies treat them.

Dimitrios's picture

For erc an:

I was not attempting to provide a full analysis of all stirrings of inter-communal violence and how they came about. At different periods violence was instigated by elements one side or another.... The fact remains that, the Greek Cypriots are indigenous to the island and that the present day Turks were brought there in more recent history - let's not lose sight of this. If we look at the history of Cyprus over the last millennium, the Turkish presence is a recent phenomenon that resulted from barbaric invasions and settlement. From this perspective, one can understand why many indigenous Greek Cypriots wanted to cement their union with what they considered to be their mother country (Greece).

Of course, the above is not to suggest that in the year 2014, all Cypriots of Turkish extraction should be forcibly uprooted and kicked out of the island. Nobody reasonable has suggested that. However, for the purposes of reunification and reconciliation, one cannot and should not recognize an artificial demarcation that resulted from what is universally considered to be an illegal and unjustified invasion and occupation of 40% of a sovereign state! Quite simply, recognition of present demarcation lines of occupied Cyprus is tantamount to recognition of an illegal occupation and a de facto reward for the aggressor nation (Turkey).

For e r c:

I do not condone or accept the selfish interests of international powers and their need to have bases on the island.

On the question of the S300 missles, firstly this is a defensive weapon to shoot down enemy aircraft and would not at the slightest upset the balance of power in the region which is overwhelmingly in Turkey's favour. Secondly, this was a desperate ploy from a desperate Cypriot government to get attention to an intractable problem that has been ignored by the influential powers of the world for far too long. Let's not forget that the occupied part of Cyprus has been seeking for an independent state ever since the invasion of Cyprus and how every effort to unite the island had been met with Turkish disdain from Mr Denktash and friends.

Dimitrios's picture

For erc an:

I was not attempting to provide a full analysis of all stirrings of inter-communal violence and how they came about. At different periods violence was instigated by elements one side or another.... The fact remains that, the Greek Cypriots are indigenous to the island and that the present day Turks were brought there in more recent history - let's not lose sight of this. If we look at the history of Cyprus over the last millennium, the Turkish presence is a recent phenomenon that resulted from barbaric invasions and settlement. From this perspective, one can understand why many indigenous Greek Cypriots wanted to cement their union with what they considered to be their mother country (Greece).

Of course, the above is not to suggest that in the year 2014, all Cypriots of Turkish extraction should be forcibly uprooted and kicked out of the island. Nobody reasonable has suggested that. However, for the purposes of reunification and reconciliation, one cannot and should not recognize an artificial demarcation that resulted from what is universally considered to be an illegal and unjustified invasion and occupation of 40% of a sovereign state! Quite simply, recognition of present demarcation lines of occupied Cyprus is tantamount to recognition of an illegal occupation and a de facto reward for the aggressor nation (Turkey).

For e r c:

I do not condone or accept the selfish interests of international powers and their need to have bases on the island.

On the question of the S300 missles, firstly this is a defensive weapon to shoot down enemy aircraft and would not at the slightest upset the balance of power in the region which is overwhelmingly in Turkey's favour. Secondly, this was a desperate ploy from a desperate Cypriot government to get attention to an intractable problem that has been ignored by the influential powers of the world for far too long. Let's not forget that the occupied part of Cyprus has been seeking for an independent state ever since the invasion of Cyprus and how every effort to unite the island had been met with Turkish disdain from Mr Denktash and friends.

Dimitrios's picture

For erc an:

I was not attempting to provide a full analysis of all stirrings of inter-communal violence and how they came about. At different periods violence was instigated by elements one side or another.... The fact remains that, the Greek Cypriots are indigenous to the island and that the present day Turks were brought there in more recent history - let's not lose sight of this. If we look at the history of Cyprus over the last millennium, the Turkish presence is a recent phenomenon that resulted from barbaric invasions and settlement. From this perspective, one can understand why many indigenous Greek Cypriots wanted to cement their union with what they considered to be their mother country (Greece).

Of course, the above is not to suggest that in the year 2014, all Cypriots of Turkish extraction should be forcibly uprooted and kicked out of the island. Nobody reasonable has suggested that. However, for the purposes of reunification and reconciliation, one cannot and should not recognize an artificial demarcation that resulted from what is universally considered to be an illegal and unjustified invasion and occupation of 40% of a sovereign state! Quite simply, recognition of present demarcation lines of occupied Cyprus is tantamount to recognition of an illegal occupation and a de facto reward for the aggressor nation (Turkey).

For e r c:

I do not condone or accept the selfish interests of international powers and their need to have bases on the island.

On the question of the S300 missles, firstly this is a defensive weapon to shoot down enemy aircraft and would not at the slightest upset the balance of power in the region which is overwhelmingly in Turkey's favour. Secondly, this was a desperate ploy from a desperate Cypriot government to get attention to an intractable problem that has been ignored by the influential powers of the world for far too long. Let's not forget that the occupied part of Cyprus has been seeking for an independent state ever since the invasion of Cyprus and how every effort to unite the island had been met with Turkish disdain from Mr Denktash and friends.

Dimitrios's picture

My apologies for the multiple entries... I did not mean for these....

Dimitrios's picture

Dear friends, one final comment and disclaimer from me (a Greek from mainland Greece).

If it is in the mutual benefit of Cypriots to unite their island and capilize on the opportunities of unification, they should be left to do so and assisted in a positive way.

To state the obvious, it is not for Greece, for Turkey, or any other third party to preach, lecture, or attempt to influence one way or another.

This realization must not take away from the historical facts on the ground that the island was illegally invaded and occupied by another country; albeit any excuse or justification that has been offered for this invasion.

The Serbs wanted to "protect" their ethnic Serb brothers in Bosnia, but were driven off with bombings as it was found they were invading a sovereign territory (Bosnia Herzegovina). Why is this any different to what should applied in the case of Cyprus? Cypriots should be allowed to solve their own affairs within the auspices of the UN and other international bodies. Even if there was credibility in the argument for a Turkish invasion, why has the occupation been maintained for a whole 30 years+ ???

Dimitrios's picture

correction: Turkish occupation maintained for 40+ years (not 30 years - a clear typo!)!

Peter's picture

Wow Dimitrios,I was all along right that you were a Turk or Albanian.No real Yunanistani if there was one will agree to live side by side with a Turk unless you are one.
You pseudo "Greeks"the likes of Turkoglou(Venizelos)are the main ingredient in the make up of modern Yunanistan.
I must give it to you for willing to live side by side with the Turks,it is only humane thing to do, now can you do same with the indigenous Macedonians and your Northern neighbor Republic of Macedonia live side by side in Peace?.

Dimitrios's picture

Peter

For your information, I have more respect for the Turks than I have for your propagandist scum-bags, offshoots of mother Bulgaria.

At least, with the Turks, one knows the dispute is about land or the balance of power in a region. You people on the other hand, are a bigger menace to the Greek state than Turkey would ever be. Your very existence, as a nation state, is built on a fallacy of misappropriating another's history as your own.

Indigenous? To Bulgaria perhaps, but to no other.... The Slavs arrived to the wider region a good 1,000 years after the fall of the kingdom of Macedon.... an empire and a people inextricably linked to the Ancient Greeks.

On another question, what business do you have trolling the net and taking a position on a matter that ordinarily should not be of any interest to you.... it is probably because you are preoccupied with whatever platform you can get your hands on to regurgitate your propaganda about the FYROM's claim to "Macedonia".

My suggestion to you is worry less about Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus, and more about how to live your life to the full. Perhaps you can start by spending less time trolling the internet and writing crap. If you do not want to heed my advice and you still wish to talk 'nationalism', perhaps you can spend some time pondering on the future of the FYROM.

My guess is that in less than 25 years from now, your pseudo statelet will have a considerable chunk of it to the north west cut off to form the newest state in the Balkans (home to the 30% of your population; ethnic Albanians".

Dimitrios

Peter's picture

Dimitrios,the problem is,you have stuck your nose in to Macedonia's affairs,not the Macedonians into your affairs.As far as the continuity is concerned,you did read Mario Alinei's research as well as the Madrid and Oxford Universities findings about the assumed late arrival of the Slavs in the area.For your information,Alexander the Great was a Proto/Slav,who had not a drop of Hellenic blood in his body.Your Yunanistani theory of Slavs arriving in the 6th century is a "Greek"propaganda to hide the facts to usurp the Macedonian history of ancient Macedonia as well as in the present day.Dimitrios,when I was growing up in Aegean Macedonia I was called"Bulgar"by the Greek military police.It was not because we were Bulgars,but it was the Greek hate against the Bulgarians since 1913,1926 and the Bulgarian invasion of Aegean Macedonia during the Nazi occupation during the second World War.I have a friend from the Sparta area,he once told me to say that I am "Greek"he would say he is Macedonian.I told him"I will say I am Greek when you say you are a Turk".His answer was"Tha sou doso mia bunia."I told him,I am Macedonian,if you don't respect my identity,why should I respect yours,and here we are,you and I,or should I say Greece versus Macedonia?.The street is a two way street.Well,I like to see what happens with the Turkoglou visit to Macedonia next week,in the mean time,have a nice day!

Dimitrios's picture

Peter,

There is nothing intellectual and/or enlightening in your posts about the subject of the name "Macedonia".

For this reason, it is futile to argue and/or debate with you.

You can regard yourself as Macedonian if you like. I cannot stop you nor to I intend to. It is not as if you are the first or the last who suffers from delusions of grandeur.

In fact, you will find that this delusion of grandeur is also shared by many in your population, including the politicians who organised for a massive busk of Alexander the Great in Skopje.

Good luck to you Peter and hopefully now that you have come to terms with you "Macedonian" identity, you might be on the road to settle other matters in your life.

Regards

Dimitrios

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