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10/12/2016

EU to propose mandatory migrant settlement quotas

EU Priorities 2020

EU to propose mandatory migrant settlement quotas

Recently landed migrants, Lampedusa.

[Noborder Network/Flickr]

The European Commission will propose that countries share responsibility for housing thousands of refugees arriving in Europe from across the Mediterranean.

According to the Times, President Jean-Claude Juncker on Wednesday (13 May) will propose a “mandatory migrant quota system” under which the EU’s 28 member states will share responsibility for migrants during times of emergency, the British newspaper reported.

“To ensure a fair and balanced participation of all member states to this common effort… the EU needs a permanent system for sharing the responsibility for large numbers of refugees and asylum seekers among member states,” the proposal reads, the Times reported on Monday (11 May).

The number of refugees sent to each country would be decided according to a “redistribution key” based on GDP, population size, unemployment rate and past numbers of asylum seekers, it added.

Currently, asylum seekers are the responsibility of the country in which they first arrive, meaning countries close to migrant crossing routes such as Italy, Malta and Greece have complained of shouldering the bulk of Europe’s refugee crisis.

At an EU summit in April, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose country, along with Sweden, takes in a large proportion of asylum-seekers, called for a change in the EU’s system of managing asylum claims to better distribute the pressures across the bloc.

>>Read: Juncker suffers double blow on immigration at summit

But few governments are willing to take on a greater share, and agreements on Thursday were limited. Member states will consider a voluntary scheme to ease the burden of arrivals on “frontline” states in the south – notably Italy, Greece and Malta. And they plan a pilot project to bring in refugees from abroad and resettle them around the continent, seeking a broad distribution.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=rrTNAphownw

On Wednesday, Juncker will propose the EU resettle an extra 20,000 asylum seekers identified by the United Nations per year by 2020, The Times reported.

Britain’s Home Office said the plans were unacceptable and that efforts should focus on stopping people traffickers.

“The UK has a proud history of offering asylum to those who need it most, but we do not believe that a mandatory system of resettlement is the answer,”

a home office spokesman said.

“We will oppose any EU Commission proposals to introduce a non-voluntary quota.”

The report follows a meeting by EU defence ministers in France to tackle the increasing flow of migrants making the perilous sea crossing from North Africa that has seen 5,000 people die in the last 18 months.

The Times said the issue would be British Conservative leader David Cameron’s “first battle” of his second term as prime minister, after an election in which over 12 percent of British people voted for the anti-EU, anti-immigration UK Independence Party.

Under pressure from the eurosceptic wing of his own party, Cameron has promised to cut immigration to under 100,000 and re-negotiate the terms of Britain’s membership of the EU, before holding an in-out referendum by 2017.

The plans “pose a direct threat to British membership of the European Union,” the paper reported.

“For David Cameron, now committed to a referendum on Britain’s very membership of the European Union, the timing is laughably poor,” it added.

Background

Meeting on short notice for an extraordinary summit on 23 April, EU leaders decided to treble annual funding to €120 million to the Operation Triton, an EU frontier operation off of the coast of Italy, putting it at the same level of funding as the defunct Italian Mare Nostrum mission.

Among 17 proposals in a summit communiqué, leaders agreed to "undertake systematic efforts to identify, capture and destroy vessels before they are used by traffickers". It is unclear how that may be achieved, and several leaders said they would need a UN mandate in the absence of a viable Libyan government.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose country, along with Sweden, takes in a large proportion of asylum-seekers, called for a change in the EU's system of managing asylum claims to better distribute the pressures across the bloc.

>>Read: Juncker suffers double blow on immigration at summit

But few governments are willing to take on a greater share, and agreements on Thursday were limited. Member states will consider a voluntary scheme to ease the burden of arrivals on "frontline" states in the south - notably Italy, Greece and Malta. And they plan a pilot project to bring in refugees from abroad and resettle them around the continent, seeking a broad distribution.