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08/12/2016

Ukraine says Russia directly attacked its forces

Europe's East

Ukraine says Russia directly attacked its forces

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk. Kyiv, April 2014. [US Embassy, Ukraine]

Ukrainian army units came under attack from Russian troops in eastern Ukraine on Tuesday (20 January) and heavy fighting was taking place, a Ukrainian military spokesman said.

The announcement at a specially called news briefing was one of the boldest assertions yet by Ukraine of direct Russian military involvement in the nine-month conflict between pro-Russian separatists and government forces.

“In spite of preliminary agreements, Ukrainian military units were attacked in the north of the anti-terrorist operational zone by regular military formations of the armed forces of Russia,” the spokesman, Andriy Lysenko, said.

“Heavy fighting is continuing near (Ukrainian army) checkpoints 29 and 31,” he said, pinpointing an area near the town of Slovyanoserbsk, northwest of the city of Luhansk.

“Ukrainian forces have stopped the advance of Russian troops … The situation in the conflict zone is serious but under our control,” Lysenko said at a news briefing.

Three more battalion tactical groups of Russian motorised infantry had been tracked inside Russia heading towards the Ukrainian border, as well as an artillery division, he said.

Lysenko had no immediate figures for estimated casualties.

Ukraine’s assertion that its troops were now engaged with Russian regular forces in its separatist-minded eastern regions followed a flurry of charges by Kyiv that the Russian military was stepping up incursions to support the rebels.

Despite what the West and Kyiv say is incontrovertible proof, Moscow has consistently denied that any of its regular forces are deployed in Ukraine.

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The region around Luhansk includes a huge stretch of border with Russia and, with large parts of it under the control of separatists, is vulnerable to an inflow of military equipment and Russian forces.

Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk said on Monday that Russian-made rocket and weapons systems were pouring into the country and Lysenko on Tuesday said two battalion tactical groups, each of about 400 men, had crossed into Ukraine from Russia – a charge dismissed as “absolute nonsense” by the Russian defence ministry.

In a separate statement, the Ukrainian defence ministry said Ukrainian forces had withdrawn from one of the two checkpoints under attack and, with the aid of reinforcements, were trying to dislodge enemy forces.

Four-way ministerial due

Ukraine’s announcement was certain to ratchet up tension between Kyiv and Moscow on the eve of a planned meeting in Berlin of four foreign ministers that should bring Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin face to face with Russia’s Sergei Lavrov.

Wednesday’s meeting, which also brings in the German and French foreign ministers, has been called to give fresh impetus to stalled efforts to end the worst crisis between Russia and the West since the end of the Cold War.

The crisis started with the popular overthrow of a Moscow-backed president by street protests in Kyiv a year ago.

Russia subsequently annexed Ukraine’s Crimea peninsula and threw its weight behind a pro-Russian separatist rebellion, leading to a conflict in which more than 4,800 people have been killed and the West has applied sanctions against Russia.

Ukrainian forces at the weekend launched a counter-offensive to reclaim ground lost to separatists near the international airport in the big city of Donetsk, bringing condemnation from Moscow, which said this had damaged the prospects for a four-power summit on the conflict.

Earlier on Tuesday, Ukraine’s Klimkin pressed for further meetings to implement agreements reached in Minsk, Belarus, last September with Russia and separatist leaders including strengthening a much-violated ceasefire.

Klimkin said separatist forces had abused the Minsk deal by seizing 500 sq km (194 sq miles) of territory beyond agreed separation lines since it was struck. 

Background

The crisis in Ukraine erupted after its former President Viktor Yanukovich cancelled plans to sign trade and political pacts with the EU in November 2013 and instead sought closer ties with Russia, triggering protests that turned bloody and drove him from power.

Moscow annexed Crimea in March following a referendum staged after Russian forces established control over the Black Sea peninsula in the biggest East-West crisis since the Cold War.

Pro-Russian militants control buildings in more than ten towns in eastern Ukraine after launching their uprising on 6 April. On 11 May, pro-Moscow rebels declared a resounding victory in a referendum in Donetsk and Luhansk, which the West called illegal and illegitimate.

The fighting has escalated sharply after Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko ordered on 1 July an assault on separatists. The EU's resolve to punish Russia strengthened after the downing in Ukraine on 17 July of a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane, killing all 298 people on board. 194 of the passengers were from the Netherlands.

Western leaders say pro-Russian rebels almost certainly shot the airliner down by mistake with a Russian-supplied surface-to-air missile. Moscow has blamed Kyiv for the tragedy.

On 27 August, NATO and the U.S. said Russian incursions into Ukraine took an ‘overt and obvious form’ and on 28 August Poroshenko said Russia had invaded Ukraine.

>> Read: Poroshenko says Russia invaded Ukraine

A truce was agreed on 5 September, but the situation has remained volatile.