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Mogherini: UN mission in Colombia is ‘great opportunity’

Global Europe

Mogherini: UN mission in Colombia is ‘great opportunity’

The FARC has been involved in guerrilla fighting against the government for over half a century.

[Camilo Rueda López/Flickr]

Federica Mogherini said on Tuesday (26 January) that the UN’s political mission in monitoring the ceasefire between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) is a step toward securing peace for the country.

The EU’s foreign policy chief said that the new mission, approved yesterday (25 January) by the UN Security Council, “moves Colombia a step closer to peace”.

She also added that “international commitment is vital to help Colombia overcome a legacy of conflict and violence, and to lay the foundations for a peaceful and stable future”.

The two sides called upon the UN to get involved last week, during talks that were held in Havana, and the mission is expected to involve countries from Latin America and the Caribbean (CELAC).

Mogherini said that it is a “great opportunity” for the CELAC countries to participate and collaborate “toward regional stability and show solidarity with Colombia”.

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Additionally, the High Representative highlighted the “close cooperation” of the European Union and CELAC, as well as the will of the bloc to continue to “build a close relationship with Colombia, in support of the peace process” and that “the EU will join forces with its partners in order to achieve a common goal: peace and justice for the Colombian people”.

The United Nations unanimously adopted resolution 2261 yesterday, creating an unarmed mission that will monitor the ceasefire.

The Security Council agreed that the operation will have a mandate of 12 months that can be extended if both parties agree. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said that preparations would begin “immediately”.

The UN’s decision was ultimately quite unusual, given that all 15 members of the Council supported it, something that has only happened 14 times in 70 years.