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03/12/2016

Archived: Britain votes to leave the European Union

UK & Europe

Archived: Britain votes to leave the European Union

The all-important 23 June date is fast approaching.

[Shutterstock]

The United Kingdom on Thursday (23 June) voted to leave the European Union, in a result that is likely to rock the 28-country bloc.

  • Official referendum results : 51.9% for Brexit‬ – 48.1% for Remain;
  • The voter turnout was 72.16%;
  • David Cameron announced earlier this morning that he will step down as prime minister by October.

Follow EurActiv’s live feed for all the latest developments, as they happen.

Freddie Martyn 15/06/201617:04

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

Brexit stirs up Euroscepticism in the French right

Nominally a supporter of the European project, Nicolas Sarkozy’s Republican party has made increasingly frequent attacks on the European Commission, which it accuses of “pushing out the UK and letting Turkey in”. EurActiv France reports.

EurActiv.com

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

An unnecessary referendum with devastating consequences

The Euro-poison that has infected the British political system will not be eradicated after 23 June referendum on the UK’s EU membership, as polls suggest neither side will obtain a clear victory, writes Fraser Cameron.

EurActiv.com

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:26

Juncker: Brexit won’t be the death of the EU

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker today (16 July) said that the European Union would survive a Brexit – the UK voting to leave the bloc in the referendum to be held in one week’s time.

EurActiv.com

Maxime Sattonnay 16/06/201615:46

Our Live Countdown to the Brexit referendum continues here: http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/brexit-stirs-up-euroscepticism-in-the-french-right/

Samuel White 16/06/201618:28

UK referendum campaign suspended after MP shot dead 'by man shouting Britain first'

A British member of parliament has died this evening (16 June) after being shot and stabbed in her constituency in northern England by a man reported to have shouted “Britain first”, before his attack.

EurActiv.com

Daniela Vincenti 16/06/201621:02

The International Monetary Fund warned on 16 June that a British vote next week to break with the European Union could stifle economic growth and weaken the ties that bind the eurozone.

In a new report on the euro area, the IMF warned that the 19-nation single-currency bloc already faces rising doubts from within that could loosen its bonds, including from tensions over the refugee crisis and from financial strains. It said a pro-Brexit vote on June 23 could exacerbate that trend.

Maxime Sattonnay 17/06/201610:08

US group: Alleged killer of British MP was neo-Nazi supporter

The alleged killer of British lawmaker Jo Cox was a “dedicated supporter” of a neo-Nazi group based in the United States, a civil rights group reported Thursday (16 June).

EurActiv.com

Maxime Sattonnay 17/06/201610:08

Jo Cox murder seen as boosting Britain’s pro-EU campaign

The murder of labour MP Jo Cox yesterday by a man shouting “Britain first” will hurt momentum for Brexit and reflect poorly on those campaigning to leave the European Union by linking them to a murderer, analysts have said.

EurActiv.com

Samuel White 17/06/201610:55
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:17

City bets on pound to suffer bigger plunge than ‘Black Wednesday’ after Brexit vote

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:19

Norwegian minister: 'We have the same rights and duties as EU member states'

Although Norway is not an EU member, it has agreed on a voluntary contribution of €2.8 billion to promote economic and social cohesion in poorer Eastern European countries. “It’s a win-win situation,” explains Elisabeth Aspaker who adds: “It’s not a rule that we should get something back.”

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:20

Although Norway is not an EU member, it has agreed on a voluntary contribution of €2.8 billion to promote economic and social cohesion in poorer Eastern European countries.

Norwegian minister: 'We have the same rights and duties as EU member states'

Although Norway is not an EU member, it has agreed on a voluntary contribution of €2.8 billion to promote economic and social cohesion in poorer Eastern European countries. “It’s a win-win situation,” explains Elisabeth Aspaker who adds: “It’s not a rule that we should get something back.”

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:20

The pound extended its rally in Asian trade Monday (20 June) as investors swung their bets to Britain voting to stay in the European Union this week and latest polls showed support shifting to the Remain camp after the murder of a pro-EU lawmaker.

Remain camp gains momentum in first Brexit poll since Jo Cox murder

The pound extended its rally in Asian trade Monday (20 June) as investors swung their bets to Britain voting to stay in the European Union this week and latest polls showed support shifting to the Remain camp after the murder of a pro-EU lawmaker.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:23

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:27

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:31

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:35

Brexit vote pits London, Scotland against middle England

Britain’s vote on European Union membership on Thursday is set to split regions against regions, with Scotland and the main cities expected to back remaining while the English countryside votes out.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:36

Luxembourg warns of Brexit 'domino effect' in Eastern Europe

A British exit from the European Union could trigger similar moves by other member states in Eastern Europe, Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said in a German newspaper interview published yesterday (19 June).

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:37

For Aart De Geus, chairman and CEO of the Bertelsmann Stiftung, the implications are clear. “In the case of a Brexit, everyone would lose. The economic costs to the UK would be enormous and the EU’s international position would be weakened as well. Germany would suffer negative economic repercussions and would lose an important political ally in Europe,”

http://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/en/topics/aktuelle-meldungen/2016/mai/brexit-and-the-consequences-an-overview/

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:43

Oscar Wilde quipped that socialism would take too many evenings. So, too, would the process of Britain leaving the EU, let alone adapting to life outside it

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/reluctant-case-against-brexit-three-central-questions-16615

Maxime Sattonnay 20/06/201609:57
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201609:57

For Aart De Geus, chairman and CEO of the Bertelsmann Stiftung, the implications are clear. “In the case of a Brexit, everyone would lose. The economic costs to the UK would be enormous and the EU’s international position would be weakened as well. Germany would suffer negative economic repercussions and would lose an important political ally in Europe,”

http://www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/en/topics/aktuelle-meldungen/2016/mai/brexit-and-the-consequences-an-overview

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:09

David Cameron EU Question Time: PM attacks ‘untrue’ Leave claims

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36570766

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:10

The BBC asks 50 question on the UK referendum

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-32810887

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:11

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:14

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:14

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:16

The Independent’s analysis is based on data provided by the Office of National Statistics. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/this-chart-shows-how-wrong-vote-leave-are-on-immigration-a7083476.html

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:23
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:24
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:29

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:29

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:31

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/eu-referendum-boris-johnson-brexit-support-single-market-leave-european-union-video-a7089991.html

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:32

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/681350/David-Cameron-Question-Time-BBC-David-Dimbleby-Brexit-EU-referendum-Neville-Chamberlain

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:33

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/blog/live/2016/jun/19/eu-referendum-david-cameron-on-bbcs-question-time-eu-special

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201610:40

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Freddie Martyn 20/06/201611:04

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201611:06

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201611:08
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201611:08

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/07/farage-calls-migrant-sex-attack-comments-tiddly-issue-in-eu-referendum-campaign?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=EU+referendum+briefing+2016&utm_term=176224&subid=18999515&CMP=ema-3239

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201611:56
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201612:13
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201615:16

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201615:19

British embassy Brexit party playlist includes Europe's The Final Countdown

EXCLUSIVE / British embassy staff in Brussels are planning a Brexit bash the night of the 23 June referendum. EurActiv.com has had an exclusive peek at the party playlist, which includes The Final Countdown by Swedish hair metal headbangers Europe.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201615:19
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201615:19

Remain camp gains momentum in first Brexit poll since Jo Cox murder

The pound extended its rally in Asian trade Monday (20 June) as investors swung their bets to Britain voting to stay in the European Union this week and latest polls showed support shifting to the Remain camp after the murder of a pro-EU lawmaker.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201615:54

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201616:17

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201616:22

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Freddie Martyn 20/06/201616:35
Freddie Martyn 20/06/201617:40

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Freddie Martyn 20/06/201620:25

Freddie Martyn 20/06/201620:28

Samuel White 21/06/201609:44

Click here to see YouGov’s interactive map of Euroscepticism in Britain

Samuel White 21/06/201609:50

Samuel White 21/06/201613:12

AFP reports

Spanish economy minister calls Brexit vote ‘Pandora’s box’

Spanish Economy Minister Luis de Guindos said Britain’s decision to hold a referendum on whether to stay or quit the European Union had opened a “Pandora’s box” to populism.

“Staging a referendum is a mistake, we have opened a Pandora’s box,” Guindos told a business forum late Monday (20 June).

“I am convinced Brexit will not happen, I am convinced that the British will be rational,” he added.

“Please let’s not get into this situation again, because it can have effects in other nations where populism is advancing very quickly.”

De Guindos said the decision to call the referendum has “a component of populism.”

If Britain votes to leave the EU it would be “a political failure” for British Prime Minister David Cameron’s conservative government, he said.

His comments come as polls suggest the outcome in Thursday’s vote could go either way. Analysts have predicted a Brexit could unleash a domino effect within the 28-nation bloc.

Samuel White 21/06/201613:16

AFP reports

‘Please stay’, French businesses implore Britain

France’s biggest businesses, from Airbus to Michelin, have implored their “amis britanniques” to stay in the European Union in a cross-Channel love letter published in several British dailies.

“S’il vous plait, amis britanniques remain!” (Please stay, British friends). We love you, but we are in business not just in love,” read the letter published in The Sun, The Telegraph and The Times.

“Our companies invest in the UK and employ thousands all over England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, in every walk of life. We invest because you are a leader in Europe’s single market and we all trade freely within the EU,” it continued.

The letter, signed by 34 of France’s top businesses, said that this investment depended on the UK being “firmly and lastingly anchored within the single market.”

“Britain is Great. But to remain attractive to businesses you need the ingredients of that greatness: market access and open trade.”

The letter comes two days before Britain’s referendum on breaking with the European Union. If the so-called Brexit takes place, Britain would lose its free trade access to the bloc.

Polls suggest the race is tight and could go either way.

“For you, for us, for all of us: please don’t leave,” concluded the letter.

Other companies signing the letter were Air France-KLM, telecommunications giants Orange and Bouygues, banks BNP Paribas and Société Generale, pharmaceutical company Pierre Fabre and food manufacturer Danone.

Insurance company Axa, electricity provider Engie, aviation manufacturer Dassault and the defence and aerospace multinational Thales were also on the list.

Samuel White 21/06/201614:14

AFP reports

Armani urges trendsetter Britain to stay in EU

Giorgio Armani has urged Britain to stay in the European Union, warning that the bloc would be worse off without England’s influence on fashion and design.

“I’m in favour of the British staying in Europe,” the legendary Italian designer said in Milan, where a week of menswear shows wrapped up on Tuesday (21 June) with the unveiling of Armani’s main spring-summer 2017 collection.

“The island is part of Europe and I have always seen England as the avant-garde part of Europe – the bit that moves, that develops, always the first to do something eccentric and to give space for art.”

Britain is a relatively minor player in Europe’s fashion industry in terms of manufacturing and global sales.

But the country’s vibrant music and street fashion scenes have helped to make it disproportionately influential on catwalk trends.

British designers are dotted around the top fashion houses on the continent and London fashion schools attract talent from all over the world.

A recent survey of UK-based designers by the British Fashion Council found that 90% wanted the country to stay in the EU, mainly because of concerns that Brexit would make it harder to export their wares and that international student numbers could fall through tighter visa restrictions.

Vivienne Westwood, one of the innovative designers Armani perhaps had in mind, said it would be “absolutely tragic” if Britain were to leave the EU.

“I am disgusted that we might leave,” said the 75-year-old who made her name by putting punk style on the catwalk. “I’m ashamed of what is going on in England. It is awful.

“We fought two world wars to have cooperation and unity and now it is like every man for himself,” added Westwood.

“And somehow the English have been manipulated into thinking they’ll get more money if they leave and of course they won’t because the whole world is bankrupt and everything is getting worse and worse.”

Samuel White 21/06/201614:26

Samuel White 21/06/201614:26

Samuel White 21/06/201617:37

Samuel White 21/06/201617:49

AFP reports

Sarkozy calls for French-German push to save Europe

Former French president Nicolas Sarkozy called on Tuesday (21 June) for Paris and Berlin to make a joint push for “a new European treaty” following Britain’s vote on whether to leave the bloc.

After talks with Germany’s Angela Merkel, Sarkozy said: “I told the chancellor that to save Europe, there would have to be a French-German initiative in the coming months, with a new treaty that tells 450 million Europeans that we have heard what they are saying, that we understand how they feel.”

“I think that the chancellor is ready,” he said after a closed-door lunch, adding “that’s all the better as there will soon be elections in France that would be followed by polls in Germany”.

Sarkozy also stressed the importance of core EU members France and Germany leading Europe.

“What is the problem today? There is no leadership because in the French-German couple, the ‘French’ is missing,” he said, in a direct attack against President Francois Hollande, who defeated Sarkozy in the 2012 polls.

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201608:50

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201608:54

British celebrities seem to have made up their mind on tomorrow’s vote.

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201608:55

David Cameron offers his thoughts on calling for an EU referendum.

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201610:43

Data analysis shows more Twitter users want to remain in the EU

An analysis of over one and a half million tweets mentioning Brexit over the last two weeks indicates that Twitter users in the UK tend to support remaining in the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201611:02

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201611:02

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:58

‘Please don’t go’, Balkan leaders tell UK

When Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama wrote to the Times of London about the risk of Brexit, his message was clear – and echoed other Balkan nations desperate to join the European Union.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:58

UN boss: Brexit would mean rewriting Paris Agreement on climate change

A vote for Brexit in tomorrow’s UK referendum on EU membership (23 June) would mean that the COP21 agreement would have to be rewritten, the executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change said today (22 June) in Brussels.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:58

Italy’s 5 Star Movement wants euro referendum

Italy’s anti-establishment 5-Star movement, buoyed by its big gains in local elections, used its
resurgent strength to press demands for a national a referendum on whether to keep the euro.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:58

Britain's newspapers take sides on Brexit

In the last days and weeks, one by one, all major British newspapers have publicly come out on their chosen sides ahead of tomorrow’s (23 June) referendum on Europe.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:58

Le Pen calls for ‘exit’ referendums across the EU

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen called Tuesday (21 June) on all European Union members to follow Britain’s example in holding a referendum on remaining in the bloc.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:59

Football atmosphere prevails at last debate ahead of UK referendum

Rival sides in Britain’s referendum on European Union membership clashed in a passionate debate to the roars of an audience of six thousand in a London concert arena yesterday (21 June).

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201612:59

British embassy Brexit party playlist includes Europe's The Final Countdown

EXCLUSIVE / British embassy staff in Brussels are planning a Brexit bash the night of the 23 June referendum. EurActiv.com has had an exclusive peek at the party playlist, which includes The Final Countdown by Swedish hair metal headbangers Europe.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 22/06/201613:00

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201613:00

Rome, June 22, 2016 (AFP) – There will be no corks popping in Italy if Britain votes to leave the EU on Thursday: winemakers fear Brexit could burst prosecco’s bubble in its number one export market. Coldiretti, the association of Italian food producers, warned on the eve of the referendum that: “Brexit, by triggering a devaluation of sterling, could seriously upset trade relations.”

Freddie Martyn 22/06/201613:01

London, June 22, 2016 (AFP) – Volunteers from Paris travelled to London Wednesday to hand out love letters from France aiming to persuade Britons to stay in the EU on the eve of a knife-edge referendum. Standing outside one of London’s busiest commuter rail stations, around 15 volunteers from “Operation Croissant” handed out postcards with handwritten messages from French nationals. “Because what would you do without French kiss?” read one. Organisers had hoped to distribute freshly-baked croissants with the roughly 500 postcards sending greetings from the city of love ahead of Thursday’s European Union membership vote. But their plans were scuppered by British police, who cited laws banning campaigners from providing food to voters in the run-up to an election because it could corrupt the result.

James Crisp 22/06/201613:38

James Crisp reports

The European Commission today denied that its president Jean-Claude Juncker would step down “because of health reasons” if Britons vote to leave the EU.

At its daily midday press briefing, the Commission knocked back questions over Juncker’s health, which has dogged the former Luxembourg PM’s presidency.

Chief spokesman Margaritis Schinas also denied that the reason that the Commission had not campaigned for Britain to Remain was because it was unpopular with Brits.

Schinas said, “The Commission was not and is not part of the campaign. This is an issue for the British people and the British people alone.

“We said back in February that the Commission was instrumental in facilitating the negotiation between the UK and its 27 partners in bringing about a deal that addresses the concerns the British PM had put. This deal was unanimously agreed upon at European Council and then referendum was called where two platforms took the two positions

“The Commission’s role stopped then and it was then for the established platforms to work and address the pros and cons of this process.”

“On the second question [regarding Juncker stepping down]the answer is no.”

Juncker was also criticised in the briefing for giving an interview, which discussed Brexit, with German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung but not speaking to any British media outlets at all during the referendum campaign, which ends today.

Juncker will meet European Council President Donald Tusk and European Parliament President Martin Schulz at 10.30am CET on Friday to discuss the referendum result.

Depending on the results, the next steps will be announced after those talks.

James Crisp 22/06/201615:08

James Crisp 22/06/201615:08

Winston Churchill’s grandson, MP Sir Nicholas Soames, has released a series of videos in the run-up to tomorrow’s vote. Here’s the last – a call to arms.

James Crisp 22/06/201615:20

European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker insisted on Wednesday that there would be no renegotiations with Britain following its membership referendum.

“The British policy makers and British voters have to know that there will not be any kind of renegotiation,” Juncker told reporters in Brussels.

Juncker said the EU would not go further than the renegotiation deal that Prime Minister David Cameron sealed with his counterparts at a summit in February.

“We have concluded a deal with the prime minister, he got the maximum he could receive, we gave the maximum we could give,” Juncker said after talks with new Austrian Chancellor Christian Kern.

“So there will be no kind of renegotiation, nor on the agreement we found in February, nor as far as any kind of treaty negotiations are concerned. Out is out.”

Cameron had suggested on Wednesday that he might push for further reforms, especially on free movement, if Britain votes to stay in the EU in Thursday’s referendum.

James Crisp 22/06/201615:48
James Crisp 22/06/201615:52

Juncker: ‘I am basically not a fan of referendums’

James Crisp reports.

We’ve dug out Juncker’s interview with German newspaper FAZ. Here are the stand out lines.

He is “basically not a big fan of referendums” because voters can be easily misled by sideshows.”

”You always get the sweats when someone dares to ask the people for its opinion. Then it comes down to the right question in the right context.

“I have hardly expressed my opinion on the Brexit debate because I have the impression it could be seen as a provocation, if the Commission intervenes in the British referendum campaign.

“The goal of ever closer union is not a historical error even if the British decidedly do not want to take this option, which is fine. One can be a member of the EU, without pursuing the question of an ever closer union.”

“I hope that Brexit will not be the result of the referendum. The British need the EU and the EU needs British pragmatism.”

Samuel White 22/06/201617:21

AFP reports

Hollande to visit Berlin ‘whatever happens’ with Brexit

French President Francois Hollande said on Wednesday (22 June) he would travel next week to Berlin following Britain’s referendum on whether to quit the European Union, regardless of the outcome.

“Whatever happens, I will be in Germany next week to work… towards relaunching the European project,” he told a joint news conference with Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven.

An aide to Hollande told AFP that he would meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, but did not know whether the visit would take place before or after an EU summit set for 28 and 29 June in Brussels.

Hollande said he had “stepped up contacts with the concerned parties” regarding the British referendum.

He met earlier on Wednesday with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, whose country currently holds the EU’s rotating presidency, “to discuss the consequences of the referendum and initiatives that should be taken for Europe whatever the result,” Hollande’s office said.

He also met with Prime Minister Robert Fico of Slovakia, which takes over the EU presidency on 1 July.

British voters cast their ballots on Thursday (23 June) to choose whether to leave or stay in the 28-nation EU.

Opinion polls indicate a tiny lead for the “Remain” camp led by Prime Minister David Cameron, four months after he announced the date for the vote, but the result is on a knife-edge.

Samuel White 22/06/201617:39

AFP reports

Trump: Britain should ‘go it alone’ and exit EU Republican White House hopeful Donald Trump admitted Wednesday (22 June) he has not studied closely whether Britain should exit the EU – but he weighed in anyway, saying the British should “go it alone”.

“I don’t think anybody should listen to me because I haven’t really focused on it very much,” the provocative billionaire told Fox News on the eve of a historic referendum that could see Britain become the first nation in EU history to defect from the bloc.

But he pointed to the “mess” of Europe’s migration crisis, a lightning-rod issue that Trump routinely brings up along with US immigration policy at his campaign rallies.

“When you look at the things that are going on over there my inclination would be go it alone and go back to where you came from,” he told the network. “That’s just my feeling.”

Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, has run a populist campaign attracting voters who are fed up with Washington and the political status quo. Many also support tighter immigration rules.

Trump has scheduled a trip to Scotland to attend the ceremonial re-opening of his golf course at Turnberry on Friday, the same day the Brexit results are expected.

“I’m right in the middle of it. I’ll be over there just as the decision’s coming in,” the real estate mogul said.

Despite voicing his support for an exit, Trump was adamant that the British make up their own minds.

“I want people to do what they want to do,” he said.

He also insisted that the result would not help him either way.

“Getting out or staying in makes no difference to me. It doesn’t have any impact on me,” he said.

“I also tell people don’t go with the recommendation because it’s a recommendation that I make – but that’s where I stand.”

Trump is one of very few prominent international figures who have publicly expressed support for the United Kingdom leaving the EU.

Samuel White 22/06/201617:53

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201608:57

A Brussels Brit: Brexit referendum is good, painful and necessary

The Brexit campaign has at times been difficult for British people living in Brussels, but the referendum is a vital challenge to the complacency and arrogance all too evident in the upper echelons of the European Union, writes James Crisp.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:05

BBC [26/06/2016] http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36602702

An estimated 46,499,537 people are entitled to take part in the vote – a record number for a UK poll.

Polling stations opened at 07:00 BST and will close at 22:00 BST.

It is only the third nationwide referendum in UK history and comes after a four-month battle for votes between the Leave and Remain campaigns.

In common with other broadcasters, the BBC is limited in what it can report while polls are open but you can follow the results as they come in across the BBC after polls close on Thursday evening.

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:05

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36602702

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:06

Institutions plan emergency sessions in event of Brexit

European President Martin Schulz told MEPs to brace for an extraordinary plenary session on Tuesday (28 June), while a meeting of the College of Commissioners would take place on Sunday (26 June) if Britons vote to leave the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:06

Xydakis: Athens is not afraid of a Brexit

Athens has no reason to fear the consequences of a Brexit vote, Greece’s Alternate Foreign Minister for European Affairs, Nikos Xydakis, told EurActiv.com on Wednesday (22 June).

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:06

Won 18, lost 11: The EU’s referendum record so far…

Whichever way Britain votes today, the referendum will be —according to a EurActiv.com tally—  the 29th such EU plebiscite in the 43 years since the UK joined the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:07

Polling day: Latest updates – Summary

– UK voters go to the polls in a referendum on whether to remain a member of the European Union or leave

– Polling stations opened at 07:00 BST and will close at 22:00 BST

– Estimated 46,499,537 people are entitled to take part in the vote

– It is only the third nationwide referendum in UK history

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:09

https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderUK/videos/2040272992865067/

European cities are lighting up with the colours of the Union Jack to show support for the Remain campaign.

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:09

After Brexit: Roadmap for a leap in the dark

This is a rough outline of the steps Europe plans to take after Britain’s referendum on Thursday (23 June) on whether to leave the European Union, based on public and private comments by officials.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:09

Anger, confusion as EU vote divides Britain

Breaking down in tears, Anthony Dunn recalled being branded a traitor and told he should leave the country for campaigning for Britain to stay in the European Union ahead of Thursday’s vote (23 June).

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:09

CFA Institute boss: 'Brexit isn't going to happen'

Institutional investors, like insurers and pension funds, are increasingly turning to long-term investments, according to Paul Smith, the head of the CFA Institute. Smith told EurActiv.com he is “very” optimistic about Europe, saying be believes Britain will not leave the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:13

Our UK Referendum countdown playlist. Enjoy!

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:15

By RIVA GOLD

The ramifications of the U.K.’s referendum Thursday on European Union membership will spill through Britain’s politics, Europe’s brittle economy and the world’s restive financial markets. A frenzy of recent polls has ping-ponged a tiny lead between the Remain and Leave camps—two points here, three points there, a point here. The last volley of polls Wednesday gave a mixed verdict—some for Leave but one with an eight-point edge for Remain. Betting markets, bookies and traders still lean toward Remain.

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:24

European President Martin Schulz told MEPs to brace for an extraordinary plenary session on Tuesday (28 June), while a meeting of the College of Commissioners would take place on Sunday (26 June) if Britons vote to leave the EU.

http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/institutions-prepare-for-emergency-sessions-if-brexit-wins

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:25

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has admitted he is “basically not a fan of referendums”, and ruled out further EU-UK negotiations, the day before Britons vote on whether to remain in or leave the bloc.

Juncker: I am not a fan of referendums but ‘out is out’

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has admitted he is “basically not a fan of referendums”, and ruled out further EU-UK negotiations, the day before Britons vote on whether to remain in or leave the bloc.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201609:35

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/22/eu-referendum-poll-the-latest-tracker-and-odds/

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:16
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Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:20

Institutions plan emergency sessions in event of Brexit

European President Martin Schulz told MEPs to brace for an extraordinary plenary session on Tuesday (28 June), while a meeting of the College of Commissioners would take place on Sunday (26 June) if Britons vote to leave the EU.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 23/06/201610:21

After some suggestions from our readers, here is our updated Brexit playlist.

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:24

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:25

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Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:26

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Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:32

Won 18, lost 11: The EU’s referendum record so far…

Whichever way Britain votes today, the referendum will be —according to a EurActiv.com tally—  the 29th such EU plebiscite in the 43 years since the UK joined the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:32

After Brexit: Roadmap for a leap in the dark

This is a rough outline of the steps Europe plans to take after Britain’s referendum on Thursday (23 June) on whether to leave the European Union, based on public and private comments by officials.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201610:42

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James Crisp 23/06/201610:55

Samuel White 23/06/201611:10

Dominique Riquet MEP (France, ALDE) told the BBC “Britain is holding the EU back”. Peter van Dalen MEP (Netherlands, ECR) disagreed, saying “the EU definitely needs the UK”. Listen to the whole debate here from minute 36.

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201611:26

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Freddie Martyn 23/06/201612:38

Britain-EU-vote-poll URGENT New EU referendum poll puts ‘Remain’ at 52 percentLondon, June 23, 2016 (AFP) – The campaign to keep Britain in the European Union has a narrow lead, according to a new opinion poll released Thursday as Britons voted in a tight referendum.

The Ipsos MORI poll for the Evening Standard newspaper put “Remain” on 52 percent and “Leave” on 48 percent, sending the pound soaring against the dollar. Polling was carried out on Tuesday and Wednesday. kah/dt/hmw

Freddie Martyn 23/06/201612:47

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James Crisp 23/06/201612:55

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James Crisp 23/06/201613:02

Bild’s front page has a series of jokey bribes to convince to Brits to Bremain.

They include;

· If you stay in the EU , we will admit that the Wembley goal was over the line;

· We will reserve the sunloungers for you at the hotel pool with our towels in the morning;

· Implement an EU directive that will forbid having a head on beer;

· Put our clocks back to be like you;

· Stop making jokes about Prince Charles’ ears;

· We will come to Queen’s 100th birthday;

· We won’t use suncream so we can be sunburnt like you;

· Germany coach Joachim Low will guard the crown jewels.

James Crisp 23/06/201613:10

Samuel White 23/06/201615:04

Amusing scenes at a Westcountry polling station

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201615:09

A word of explanation for our continental European readers – Tim Farron is the leader of the now semi-extinct Liberal Democrat party (reduced from 57 MPs to 8 after their uncomfortable spell in coalition government). And John Barnes is the England winger from the late 1980s, early 1990s, who also appeared rapping in the New Order 1990 song “World In Motion”, the official World Cup song of that year. This week Barnes came out strongly in favour of Remain, after being erroneously claimed as a Leave backer.

Now, over to you, Tim…

Samuel White 23/06/201615:12

AFP reports

In down-at-heel east London, Brexit mood prevails

Citing uncontrolled migration and a desire for independence from Brussels, several voters in the working-class borough of Havering in east London said they wanted Britain out of the EU for good.

“I’m going to feel British again,” said Diane Booth, a softly-spoken 69-year-old pensioner, adding that she wanted Britain to be self-sufficient so it did not have to rely on European food imports.

“We can’t support ourselves and I think we should be able to. I think we’ve got enough here… We’ve got pigs in this country, we’ve got chicken in this country!

“My son lives in Germany. He is quite happy there. We do clash,” said Booth, a former public-sector worker.

A poll by YouGov this year ranked Havering as the most eurosceptic part of Britain and local councillors held a symbolic vote in January to leave the EU — the first such local government motion.

“Gonna be better”

Not all local residents share their view, like 47-year-old Kate Garnham, a brand manager, who said leaving the EU would be “awful”.

“People have been too sceptical about what the ‘Remain’ campaign has to say,” she said, adding that the rival claims had been “very confusing”.

Emma, a 19-year-old student in mental health nursing, agreed saying she was “sick with all the propaganda”.

But she said she supported a “Leave” vote so that Britain would not have to be governed by EU regulations on medicines.

“It’s gonna be better for us… There is so many medications that we can’t have because of them, because of the red tape,” she said.

Joan, a woman in her 50s, also said she was planning to vote “Leave” as a way of reining in “uncontrolled immigration” from other parts of the EU.

“We’ll be the first to leave and I think the other European countries will leave after this,” she said, as she arrived to cast her ballot.

“Leave” supporters have focused their campaign on immigration, particularly the large number of eastern and southern European workers who have arrived in the country in recent years, putting pressure on public services and wages in areas of the country.

That message has resonated well beyond Havering.

“The issue that matters is immigration,” said 69-year-old retiree Barry Martin outside a polling station in Biggin Hill, a southern suburb of London, where top Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage also voted.

“They seem to be open borders and at the moment (Prime Minister David) Cameron doesn’t seem to be able to cope with it.

“They’re just coming in willy nilly. You see it in the papers everyday, they’re getting on lorries, coming over from Calais,” he said.

Lesley Syer, a 74-year-old pensioner, agreed saying: “Where are we going to put all these people?”

“I’m not racist, but it’s a small island and nobody ever says we’re that small,” she said.

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201615:14

Similarly, for those unfamiliar with the world of arrows, Bobby George is – simply – “the King of Darts.”

James Crisp 23/06/201615:33

James Crisp 23/06/201615:34

Danish Berlingske daily have written an English language editorial asking the UK not to leave the EU. Denmark is one of the most Eurosceptic member states.

James Crisp 23/06/201615:35

James Crisp 23/06/201615:36

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James Crisp 23/06/201616:27

Ex MP and Leave campaigner Louise Mensch (who lives in New York) is one of several tweeting the front page of the Spectator magazine.

James Crisp 23/06/201616:38

James Crisp 23/06/201616:39
James Crisp 23/06/201616:40

This is Nigel Farage’s final campaign video. Note the spitfires.

James Crisp 23/06/201616:57

Zahradil: Brexit is not a good option for Central Europe

“Brexit will shift the geographical and geopolitical centre of the EU eastwards and Germany will become the dominant power of the bloc,” said Czech MEP (Civic Democratic Party ) and European Conservatives and Reformists Chairman Jan Zahradil.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 23/06/201617:05

James Crisp 23/06/201617:06

James Crisp 23/06/201617:07

A proud British voting tradition is posting pictures of dogs at polling stations on Twitter.

James Crisp 23/06/201617:14

A psychic octopus called Otto has predicted that Britain will remain in the EU.

James Crisp 23/06/201617:17

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:04

2200: Just back from an official summit of UK journalists in Brussels – okay, a chat in the pub in the rain – where there were cautious but unanimous predictions of a Remain victory. Actually, one hack – who shall remain nameless (unless he’s right) – expects a 14% margin of victory.

Of course, the first rule of journalism is ‘what’s your source’?

Since there’s still an hour of actual voting to go, it’s fair to say nobody really knows anything.

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:07

A lot of the Remain optimism comes from the fact the financial markets – and the hedge funds, with their expensive private polling, seem to expect a ‘in’ vote.

But that could be staking a lot on the banksters…

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:09

A lot of the Remain optimism comes from the fact the financial markets – and the hedge funds, with their expensive private polling, seem to expect a ‘in’ vote.

But that could be staking a lot on the banksters…

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:11

A lot of the Remain optimism comes from the fact the financial markets – and the hedge funds, with their expensive private polling, seem to expect a ‘in’ vote.

But that could be staking a lot on the banksters…

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-lang=”en”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>Hedge funds had private polls today at £100k each so could beat market. Hedgie tells me fact mkt stock still means result vv close <a href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/EURref?src=hash”>eurref</a></p>&mdash; Jenni Russell (@jennirsl) <a href=”https://twitter.com/jennirsl/status/746052888531709952″>June 23, 2016</a></blockquote>

<script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:39

2240: Twenty whole minutes of voting left, then it’s all over, and the counting begins.

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201622:55

Truly apocalyptic weather in Brussels, by the way – hours of thunderstorms, lightening, thunder and torrential rain.

The Gods have spoken – thing is, what are they saying?

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201623:01

2300: (2200 UK time) Polls have closed. If you’re still in the queue, you’re legally allowed to vote, but bar that, it’s all over bar the counting.

Remember, there is NO EXIT POLL.

Matthew Tempest 23/06/201623:02

84% turnout in Gibraltar, according to the BBC.

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201600:43

First result tonight is Gibraltar: Remain 96% – Leave 4%

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201600:46

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201601:18

Newcastle: Remain 50.7 % (65,404) – Leave 49.3 % (63,598)

Orkney: Remain 63.2% (91,915) – Leave: 36.8 % (68,614)

Gibraltar: Remain 95.9% (19,322) – Leave 4.1% (823)

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201601:19

Newcastle: Remain 50,7 % (65,404) – Leave 49,3 % (63,598) Orkney: Remain 63,2% (91,915) – Leave: 36,8 % (68,614)

Gibraltar: Remain 95,9% (19,322) – Leave 4,1% (823)

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201601:20

Newcastle: Remain 50,7 % (65,404) – Leave 49,3 % (63,598)

Orkney Islands: Remain 63,2% (91,915) – Leave: 36,8 % (68,614)

Gibraltar: Remain 95,9% (19,322) – Leave 4,1% (823)

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201601:29

Sunderland: Leave 61.34 % (82,394) – Remain 38.66% (51,930)

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201601:33

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201602:39

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201602:39

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201602:43

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201603:04

The City of London votes for Remain (75%)

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201603:05

Brexit has its first million votes, but there is still a long way to go.

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201603:35

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:27

5.15am update What we know so far…

Leave 51.4%, Remain 48.7%

118 authorities still to declare.

Votes cast = 10,780, 412 LEAVE, 10,216, 261 REMAIN

Pound has plummeted against the dollar

Oil price falls (West Texas Intermediate down 4.23%, Brent North Sea Crude down 4.05%)

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:30

5.30am Nigel Farage speaks…

“I now dare to dream that the dawn is coming up on an independent United Kingdom.

“If the predictions now are right, this will be a victory for real people, a victory for ordinary people, a victory for decent people.

“I hope this victory brings down this failed project and leads us to a Europe of sovereign nation states,” he said to huge cheers at the party organised by the Leave.EU campaign.

“Let’s get rid of the flag, the anthem, Brussels and all that has gone wrong… let June 23 go down in our history as our independence day.

“We have fought against the multinationals. We have fought against the big merchant banks. We fought against big politics.

“We fought against lies, corruption and deceit, and today, honesty, decency and belief in nation I think now is going to win.

“We will have done it without having to fight, without a single bullet being fired. We’ll have done it by damned hard work on the ground.

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:36

5.35: BIG questions now if Leave maintain this lead…

– Will David Cameron and George Osborne have to resign – and when?

– Will Jeremy Corbyn face pressure to resign – for the Labour vote deserting to ‘Leave’?

– Will Scotland want another independence reference, if the Scottish ‘remain’ vote was quite weak?

– How far will the pound fall?

– What do Jean-Claude Juncker, Donald Tusk, Martin Schulz and Mark Rutte say at 10.30am?

– Is this the biggest existential crisis the EU has faced?

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:40

5.40am BREAKING ITV, the British commercial broadcaster, have called the referendum result for LEAVE.

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:41

Circumspect words from Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon on Twitter…

Every Scottish council has now declared. It’s a clean sweep for in Scotland. Well done everyone

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:48

5.43am: BBC calls it for Brexit.

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201605:49

5.45am: Sky News joins BBC and ITV in calling it as an LEAVE vote.

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201605:54

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:09

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Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:25

http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/breaking-britain-and-eu-facing-brexit-as-leave-lead-with-most-results-inkey

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:26

Britain and EU facing Brexit as ‘Leave’ lead with most results in

Britain and Brussels were waking up early Friday to the likelihood of a Brexit, as UK voters appeared to have voted to leave the 28-member bloc, in a move which threw the future of both into a period of unpredcedented uncertainty.

EurActiv.com

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:33

6:32 Today, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, will host Tusk and European Parliament President Martin Schulz at his Berlaymont headquarters in Brussels at 10:30AM. Also present will be Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, whose government holds the rotating EU presidency, to take stock and deliver a message.

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:36

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:46

6:40 The UK is now facing a “constitutional crisis”, the Scottish National Party has warned. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said the results in Scotland has delivered a strong, unequivocal vote to remain in the EU and “that the people of Scotland see their future as part of the European Union. We await the final UK-wide result, but Scotland has spoken – and spoken decisively, she continued.

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201606:54

UK economy plunges into unknown on Brexit

Britain’s economy was plunged into a dizzying unknown on Friday as the country lurched towards the EU exit, with the world economy bracing for a hit on growth and unemployment.

 

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:01

7:00 For those of you waking up, ‘Leave’ is set to win the UK’s referendum on its membership of the European Union.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:04

7:04 What will David Cameron be saying when he addresses the country, and the rest of the European Union?

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:07

7:06 Leave has passed the 50% point. As we stare at the European Commission from our office window, we can say that Britain has left the building.

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201607:09

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:10

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:12

07:13 The UK leaves the EU.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:13

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:16

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:27

Towards a Nexit and Frexit? Eurosceptic parties across Europe have vowed to follow Britain’s example and urged their country to hold a referendum on EU membership.

In the Netherlands, Geert Wilders, leader of the Party of Freedom (PVV) said: “The United Kingdom is leading the way to the future and liberation. The time is now for a new start, trusting in its own strength and sovereignty. Also in the Netherlands,” he said in a statement.

“The Dutch population deserves a referendum as well. We demand therefore a referendum on Nexit, a Dutch EU exit. Dutch people should have the opportunity as soon as possible to decide on the Dutch membership of the European Union.”

In France, Marion Le Pen has tweeted from brexit to frexit, calling for a French referendum on EU

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:27

07:27 Markets plunging after Brexit vote.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:28

Sinn Fein to push for vote for a united Ireland

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201607:40

CNN tells the world what’s next.

Daniela Vincenti 24/06/201607:47

Will the EU survive Brexit?

Britain’s vote to become the first country to leave the EU, as projected by national media, is a shattering blow that threatens the survival of the post-war European project, officials and analysts said.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:03

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:04

MAP: Britain has voted to leave the EU, here’s how they voted: (The New York Times)

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:06

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:08

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Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:28

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201608:33

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201608:34

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201608:34

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201608:35

If you missed this back in April, check out our tongue-in-cheek look at what Brexit could’ve meant for the UK. As it’s now a reality, maybe stay tuned to see how many things we, perhaps accidentally, predicted (!).

REVEALED: Europe's secret revenge plans for Brexit

EXCLUSIVE  / Vengeful European Commission officials have drawn up a secret punishment list for the UK if it chooses to leave the EU at the 23 June referendum on its membership of the bloc.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201608:40

James Crisp 24/06/201608:43

James Crisp interviewed Syed Kemall, the lead Tory MEP in Brussels and leader of the European Conservatives and Reformists Group. He voted Leave.

Can David Cameron survive?

Absolutely I think David Cameron deserves credit for the fact that he promised a referendum and he delivered a referendum. What’s important now is to make sure we respect the decision of the British people and we move on.

Scotland is talking about another independence referendum?

“The SNP exists to take Scotland out of Britain. Whatever the result would have been, the SNP would have been asked for a referendum at some stage. I always felt that.

Donald Tusk said this would be the end of western civilisation.

“We had lots of claims and counter-claims from both sides. I think the British people listened to that, they took it into account, and they decided to vote to leave and we have to respect that.”

How important was immigration in the result?

I think there are a number of different issues. I genuinely found when I was going around that British people that they were voting on different issues. For some people it was immigration that mattered the most, for others they were worried about the longer-term impact of staying in the EU. They were worried about being tied to an almost dead Eurozone as it were.

This is a damning verdict on EU politics, isn’t it?

It sends a strong signal to the EU. I know there are people from EU countries who have said to me, ‘We’d rather you didn’t leave but if you do it does send a strong signal that the EU has to change. Hopefully that will be one of the positive impacts of this.

Will the EU now be dominated by France and Germany?

I don’t know. What’s important for me now is to think about the negotiations between the EU and the UK and to make sure the UK gets a good deal. And to make sure the UK becomes a good neighbour rather than a reluctant tenant.

How long will it take for Britain to leave?

I don’t know. I have meetings now with the leaders of European Parliamentary groups and there are other meetings today. Over next few days we will get more certainty.

James Crisp 24/06/201608:51

James Crisp 24/06/201608:52

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201608:57

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201608:58

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201609:02

James Crisp 24/06/201609:07

European Union president Donald Tusk said on Friday the bloc was determined to stay unified after Britain voted to leave and warned against “hysterical” reactions.”Today on behalf of the 27 leaders, I can say that we are determined to keep our unity as 27,” Tusk told reporters in Brussels, adding that “it is a historic moment but for sure not a moment for hysterical reactions.”

James Crisp 24/06/201609:17

James Crisp interviewed Ashley Fox, a Tory MEP who voted Remain.

I guess you are out of a job?

In a year or two yes.

It’s a surprise result.

It is a surprise result. I campaigned to remain in the European Union. So I’m disappointed but I accept the result of the British people. We’ve had a 10 week campaign and the British people have made their decision. So no politicians in Britain have to implement that decision.

The main reason for this vote is freedom of movement of labour. The enormous increase in immigration we have seen over the last 15 years in the United Kingdom. The British people have decided they don’t want that. That issue was not touched upon in the renegotiation. It was quite clear that Mrs Merkel and others wouldn’t allow any change, they have their result.

What does this mean for Cameron’s position?

That’s a matter for my colleagues in Westminster. We are clearly going to have a period of political and economic turbulence in the UK and in the EU. I hope David Cameron stays on. I think we would benefit from stability at the top.

A win is a win. In was always going to be in and out was always going to be out. The margin looks like being 3-4% points but one vote would have been sufficient. The people have voted to leave and we will now implement that.

What is the next step?

A period of calm and reflection in which British politicians decide what it is we want to achieve and then we engage in negotiations with our European partners.

Donald Tusk said this would spell the end of western civilisation?

I think that is a slight overstatement.

James Crisp 24/06/201609:17

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201609:28

Cameron announces he’s resigning – will try to stay on to Conservative party conference in October to provide “stability.”

James Crisp 24/06/201609:31

European Council President Donald Tusk has reacted. There’s no hiding the fact that we wanted a different outcome of yesterday’s referendum. I am fully aware of how serious, or even dramatic, this moment is politically. And there’s no way of predicting all the political consequences of this event, especially for the UK. But for sure this is not a moment for hysterical reactions. I want to reassure everyone that we are prepared also for this negative scenario. As you know the EU is not only a fair-weather project. Over the past two days I have spoken to all the EU leaders, I mean Prime Ministers and Presidents as well as heads of the EU institutions, about the possibility of a Brexit. Today, on behalf of the twenty seven leaders I can say that we are determined to keep our unity as twenty seven. For all of us, the Union is the framework for our common future. I would also like to reassure you that there will be no legal vacuum. Until the United Kingdom formally leaves the European Union, EU law will continue to apply to and within the UK. And by this I mean rights and obligations. All the procedures for the withdrawal of the UK from the EU are clear and set out in the Treaties. In order to discuss the details of further proceedings, I have offered the leaders an informal meeting of the twenty seven in the margins of the European Council summit. And I will also propose to the leaders that we start a wider reflection on the future of our Union. Finally, it’s true that the past years have been the most difficult ones in the history of our Union. But I always remember what my father used to tell me: What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201609:45

Brexit: What to do and where to go now?

Like most tragedies, Brexit is the result of stupid mistakes, often self-inflicted. But the referendum question was put in clear and simple terms, it was actively debated and the democratic answer is clear. Any attempt to reverse it would change the situation from bad to worse, writes Philippe de Schoutheete.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 24/06/201609:50

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201610:03

Maxime Sattonnay 24/06/201610:12

James Crisp 24/06/201610:12

European Parliament President Martin Schulz has reacted. He called for stability to protect the eurozone.

“The European Parliament will met on Tuesday at 10am to adopt a resolution accessing the outcome of the referendum and describing the next steps of the EU institutions.

The whole process after referendum is on the basis of Article 50, the European Parliament is fully involved in all the next steps and I underline the European Parliament will therefore play an active role in process.

The line of European Parliament is quite clear we are very sad about the decision of the voters of the UK but it is a sovereign expression of the will of British voters to leave the EU. This is a difficult moment for both sides, the EU and UK.

We have now from a legal and procedural point of view to access the necessary next steps. We took note of announcement of PM Cameron to step down but only in October and that will create for sure debate in next meeting about the content of the declaration of PM in next council on Tues.

The group leaders…underlined that stability is needed on both sides. Stability means within the EU and 27 member states. I want to repeat what was described in settlement, which is now null and void, both sides should respect mutually their different views.

Now the UK has decided to leave and the member states must discuss how to improve the EU and how to protect especially the eurozone and how to protect eurozone from what is already happening on the pound and the international markets. We are entering turbulent times and we need stability.”

James Crisp 24/06/201610:12

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201610:14

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201610:18

Catherine Stupp 24/06/201610:35

Gianni Pittella, president of the European Parliament’s second largest political group, the Socialists & Democrats, said he will ask for article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty to be activated immediately. Article 50 sets out rules for how a member state can leave the EU.

The European Parliament will vote on a resolution on Tuesday.

“I am firmly convinced that there is a large majority of the European people and among European forces who believe it is necessary to have financial and economic governance, to have a common security and defense policy, to have a budget.”

Pittella said Europe needs long-term and short-term responses to Brexit.

“For the short term, I underline that this proposal is directly linked to the citizens: jobs, growth, employment, justice. And in the medium and long term, a project for revising the treaty,” Pittella said.

James Crisp 24/06/201610:42

James Crisp 24/06/201610:52

ALDE’s Verhofstadt has attacked David Cameron.

Let’s be honest this clarifies the situation of uncertainty and dispute in the EU that has taken nearly 40 years. So a clear decision by the British citizens on this issue of leave or remain was very needed and I think we have to 100% respect the will of British citizens and that means immediately this will of British citizens is implemented by starting Article 50 of treaty and having notification from British authorities as soon as possible.

I cannot understand what Mr Cameron has said a few moments ago. I find it unacceptable what he said that he is going to wait until October and hand it over to his successor. That means concretely that it would be possible that in the whole 2016 there is no British notification of the decision. Which is against the will of Br citizens and we continue the uncertainty that is already happening now. Uncertainty of the markets will continue in coming months. Uncertainty not only economically but also on the political level.

It could create also huge problems unbalances in other countries of EU. It could create a contagion effect. I think we have to be very serious about this. The decision to leave was really clear. This ends the discussion of nearly more than 40 years of discussion of opt-in, opt-out, rebates you name it. It has made more difficulties in the Union than give us solutions.

We have to wait for an internal catfight of the conservative party? The whole continent and all the British citizens, have to wait for it?

I am not surprised by the outcome of this referendum. I am not surprised because people have voted they no trust in this Union as it works today. I don’t see it as a vote against Europe, I see it as a vote against this European Union as it functions today. And this Union is not a Union. This union is a loose confederation of nation states, 28 now 27, based on principle of unanimity always acting too little too late.

The real conclusion for me of the outcome of referendum is that we have to rethink this EU. The best way to react to this referendum is not business as usual but to start an in-depth reform of the EU.

People are not against Europe, people are against a certain way of Europe. The way we have managed the EU over past years and past decades. We need to reform it make it less bureaucratic,

It’s our duty to reform the EU for future generations because let’s not forget 70% of young people voted for this European project and lets not forget it is those young people who will have to live with this outcome for a long time, for 60 to 70 years, with the outcome they didn’t want. Because they wanted to Remain, they wanted to continue in Europe.

The best way to pay tribute to the young people in Britain is to really rethink the EU and make it what the founding fathers initially had in mind, not a loose confederation blocked by unanimity rule that always delivered too little too late but what is a smaller less bureaucratic political union which is capable with a small government – we don’t need 28 commissioners with 28 portfolios.

The continent and Britain is divided and Putin likes this.

The best outcome would have been that Britain stayed in the Union. It’s a sad day.”

James Crisp 24/06/201610:55

UN boss: Brexit would mean rewriting Paris Agreement on climate change

A vote for Brexit in tomorrow’s UK referendum on EU membership (23 June) would mean that the COP21 agreement would have to be rewritten, the executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change said today (22 June) in Brussels.

EurActiv.com

Catherine Stupp 24/06/201611:05

Green president emotional over British MEPs leaving

Rebecca Harms, one of the presidents of the Green Party in the European Parliament, said she cried this morning when speaking to British Green MEP Jean Lambert on the phone.

Harms mentioned her work with Lambert and British Conservative MEP Charles Tannock.

“I will miss not only those two but I will miss also the specific sense of democracy and democratic procedures of my British colleagues,” Harms said.

“As a German, arriving in the European Parliament more than 12 years ago, I learned a lot about democracy, the democratic culture and the culture of discussion and also the specific humour of the Brits in politics.”

“The migration issue was used to get the majority for the Leave camp and the pro-Europeans have to also find a response to this. I’m convinced that the EU as one of the richest parts of the world has to do more to respond to this poor situation and this awful situation,” Harms said.

Catherine Stupp 24/06/201611:16

Gabriele Zimmer, president of the leftist GUE/NGL group in the European Parliament, said her group supports Sinn Fein’s call for a referendum on whether to unite Northern Ireland with the Republic of Ireland.

There are four Sinn Fein MEPs in the GUE/NGL group, one from Northern Ireland and three from the Republic of Ireland. “We are supporting our comrades in Northern Ireland who say we need another referendum.”

“London will now govern and decide about that they will have to leave the EU. I can understand if you imagine that between the Republic of Ireland and the North of Ireland will be an external border of the EU, it’s very complicated,” Zimmer said.

“This is a very hard moment for the peace process of the North of Ireland and we have to be aware of it.”

Zimmer also said David Cameron is playing a “dirty political game” by delaying negotiations with EU institutions until October.

Samuel White 24/06/201611:17

James Crisp 24/06/201611:17

Pieter Cleppe is head of the Open Europe think tank’s Brussels office. He said, “This is of course a major political event, not just for Britain but for Europe. I would point much of the blame to Brussels because what they have done is to turn a project that was originally about withdrawing trade barriers – which most people didn’t have a problem with – into more than that. People don’t like that Brussels intervenes into national budgets. People also don’t like when Brussels if organising fiscal transfers and people most certainly don’t like when the EU tries to intervene in something as sensitive as asylum policy.”

James Crisp 24/06/201611:21

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201611:23

Here is David Cameron’s press conference from earlier, in which he announced he would step down as prime minister by October.

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201611:24

Full text of Cameron resignation statement…

The country has just taken part in a giant democratic exercise – perhaps the biggest in our history. Over 33 million people – from England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Gibraltar – have all had their say.

We should be proud of the fact that in these islands we trust the people with these big decisions.

We not only have a parliamentary democracy, but on questions about the arrangements for how we are governed, there are times when it is right to ask the people themselves, and that is what we have done.

The British people have voted to leave the European Union and their will must be respected.

I want to thank everyone who took part in the campaign on my side of the argument, including all those who put aside party differences to speak in what they believed was the national interest.

And let me congratulate all those who took part in the Leave campaign – for the spirited and passionate case that they made.

The will of the British people is an instruction that must be delivered. It was not a decision that was taken lightly, not least because so many things were said by so many different organisations about the significance of this decision.

So there can be no doubt about the result.

Across the world people have been watching the choice that Britain has made. I would reassure those markets and investors that Britain’s economy is fundamentally strong.

And I would also reassure Brits living in European countries, and European citizens living here, that there will be no immediate changes in your circumstances. There will be no initial change in the way our people can travel, in the way our goods can move or the way our services can be sold.

We must now prepare for a negotiation with the European Union. This will need to involve the full engagement of the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland governments to ensure that the interests of all parts of our United Kingdom are protected and advanced.

But above all this will require strong, determined and committed leadership.

I am very proud and very honoured to have been Prime Minister of this country for 6 years.

I believe we have made great steps, with more people in work than ever before in our history, with reforms to welfare and education, increasing people’s life chances, building a bigger and stronger society, keeping our promises to the poorest people in the world, and enabling those who love each other to get married whatever their sexuality.

But above all restoring Britain’s economic strength, and I am grateful to everyone who has helped to make that happen.

I have also always believed that we have to confront big decisions – not duck them.

That’s why we delivered the first coalition government in 70 years to bring our economy back from the brink. It’s why we delivered a fair, legal and decisive referendum in Scotland. And why I made the pledge to renegotiate Britain’s position in the European Union and hold a referendum on our membership, and have carried those things out.

I fought this campaign in the only way I know how – which is to say directly and passionately what I think and feel – head, heart and soul.

I held nothing back.

I was absolutely clear about my belief that Britain is stronger, safer and better off inside the European Union, and I made clear the referendum was about this and this alone – not the future of any single politician, including myself.

But the British people have made a very clear decision to take a different path, and as such I think the country requires fresh leadership to take it in this direction.

I will do everything I can as Prime Minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months, but I do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination.

This is not a decision I have taken lightly, but I do believe it is in the national interest to have a period of stability and then the new leadership required.

There is no need for a precise timetable today, but in my view we should aim to have a new Prime Minister in place by the start of the Conservative party conference in October.

Delivering stability will be important and I will continue in post as Prime Minister with my Cabinet for the next 3 months. The Cabinet will meet on Monday.

The Governor of the Bank of England is making a statement about the steps that the Bank and the Treasury are taking to reassure financial markets. We will also continue taking forward the important legislation that we set before Parliament in the Queen’s Speech. And I have spoken to Her Majesty the Queen this morning to advise her of the steps that I am taking.

A negotiation with the European Union will need to begin under a new Prime Minister, and I think it is right that this new Prime Minister takes the decision about when to trigger Article 50 and start the formal and legal process of leaving the EU.

I will attend the European Council next week to explain the decision the British people have taken and my own decision.

The British people have made a choice. That not only needs to be respected – but those on the losing side of the argument, myself included, should help to make it work.

Britain is a special country.

We have so many great advantages.

A parliamentary democracy where we resolve great issues about our future through peaceful debate.

A great trading nation, with our science and arts, our engineering and our creativity respected the world over.

And while we are not perfect, I do believe we can be a model of a multi-racial, multi-faith democracy, where people can come and make a contribution and rise to the very highest that their talent allows.

Although leaving Europe was not the path I recommended, I am the first to praise our incredible strengths. I have said before that Britain can survive outside the European Union, and indeed that we could find a way.

Now the decision has been made to leave, we need to find the best way, and I will do everything I can to help.

I love this country – and I feel honoured to have served it.

And I will do everything I can in future to help this great country succeed.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201611:25

Brexit must not cost Wales 'a single penny', warns First Minister

Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones insisted Friday (24 June) that Cardiff be fully involved with the negotiations to come, and that the Principality should “not lose a penny”.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 24/06/201611:30

James Crisp 24/06/201611:32

James Crisp 24/06/201611:34
James Crisp 24/06/201611:35

EurActiv’s Freddie Martyn, a British guy born in France, is “distraught” after the referendum.

Catherine Stupp 24/06/201612:01

Doubts about UK’s privacy laws outside the EU

German Green MEP Jan Philipp Albrecht, who was in charge of the new EU data protection regulation in the European Parliament, said he doubts the UK could prove its privacy laws are on par with the EU’s–which would cut off trade with the bloc.

The UK data protection watchdog ICO said in a statement today that the UK will no longer follow EU privacy law once it leaves the Union. The sweeping new EU data protection regulation was passed this April and is set to go into effect in 2018.

The ICO also said that the UK will need to prove its national privacy laws are ‘adequate’ in order to trade with the EU.

Albrecht wrote in a tweet that he doubts that would be possible because the UK has “less safeguards for intelligence services than in the US”.

The European Commission has been negotiating the so-called Privacy Shield, another adequacy agreement with the United States, but the process has been hampered amid criticism from MEPs and privacy watchdogs over the US government’s surveillance programmes.

Samuel White 24/06/201612:14

France responds to the 'shock' of Brexit

The United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union will take effect from 2019. For the French, Brexit came as a surprise: a sad one for some, a happy one for others. For some French Europhiles, it is even a breath of fresh air. EurActiv France reports.

EurActiv.com

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201612:16

Britain heads forwards into the past

After months of speculating and suspense, the Brits made up their minds as 51.9% voted in favour of Brexit. Europe is hungover this morning as a period of uncertainty starts, write Nathalie Brack and Amandine Crespy.

EurActiv.com

Samuel White 24/06/201612:18

The leaders of the EU will convene in two formats over the 28-29 June summit, EurActiv.com has learned. The first will be with the outgoing UK Prime Minister David Cameron, and a second gathering without him will discuss the way forward without Britain, and decide the holding of a Conclave in July to discuss the future of the EU.

Conclave to decide the future of the EU

The leaders of the EU will convene in two formats over the 28-29 June summit, EurActiv.com has learned. The first will be with the outgoing UK Prime Minister David Cameron, and a second gathering without him will discuss the way forward without Britain, and decide the holding of a Conclave in July to discuss the future of the EU.

EurActiv.com

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201612:35

EU leaders react to brexit.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201612:35

EU leaders react to brexit.

https://twitter.com/marianorajoy/status/746250721583054849 https://twitter.com/matteorenzi/status/746247359332552705

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201612:36

EU leaders react to brexit.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201612:49

If they were in the US, then the UK and the EU would probably be told to “lawyer up” as the two sides face potentially painful divorce talks over the next two years.

Britain terminates failed marriage and heads for messy divorce

Between those cheering out of joy and those containing their tears, some are already at work devising the terms of what will come down as the most destructive political divorce in history.

EurActiv.com

Catherine Stupp 24/06/201612:53

Merkel meeting Tusk, Hollande and Renzi in Berlin on Monday

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she will meet with European Council President Donald Tusk, French President Francois Hollande and Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi on Monday in Berlin to discuss their reaction to Brexit.

Merkel will address the Bundestag on Tuesday about the German government’s reaction.

“There’s no way around it – today marks a break for Europe and a break for the unity process,” Merkel said.

Merkel called the European Union “our guarantee for peace, prosperity and stability.”

She emphasised that “the idea of European unity was an idea of peace” after years of war between European countries.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201613:01

Scotland to vote again?

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said that a second referendum on the country’s place in the UK is “highly likely”.

Sturgeon said that it was “democratically unacceptable” that Scotland faces being taken out of the EU against its will. 62% of voters cast their ballots in favour of staying in the EU.

The First Minister said that preparation for legislation on a new referendum would be forthcoming.

In an attempt to justify a second vote, Sturgeon said that people who had voted against independence would now be able to reassess their stance.

James Crisp 24/06/201613:04

James Crisp 24/06/201613:07

James Crisp 24/06/201613:12

Sarantis Michalopoulos 24/06/201613:17

Athens: Time for a democratic debate

Greece’s Foreign Affairs Minister, Nikos Kotzias, issued a statement saying that the EU should strengthen the democratization of its structures.

“The results of the British referendum reaffirm of our insistence on the need to carry out a democratic, binding debate on the future of the European Union, on the strengthening of its social functioning and on the democratization of its structures, so that it can function to serve the peoples of Europe and be attractive to the societies of the member states,” he noted.

“In general, based on the developments in recent years, and in particular with regard to the refugee issue, we express our concern at the increasing tendencies towards fragmentation of the European Union, and we stress the need to combat nationalism and extremist conduct. The priority for European leaderships should be to abandon punitive mindsets and retrenchment policies, and to cultivate a culture of democratic dialogue and consensus,” he stressed.

James Crisp 24/06/201613:34

Juncker’s press conference: The stand-out quotes.

There will be no renegotiation, there will be no renegotiation.

We hope to have UK as a close partner in the future. In a free and democratic process, the British people have expressed their decision.

We regret this decision. Personally I am very sad but we must respect it.

We are united in our response we will stay strong. We now expect the UK government to give effect to this decision as soon as possible however painful that process will be. Any delay will unnecessarily prolong uncertainty.

We stand ready to launch negotiations swiftly with UK regarding terms and conditions of its withdrawal from the EU. Until process is over UK remains member of EU with full rights and all obligations.

According to treaties, which the UK has ratified, EU law continues to apply to the full.

Asked by the BBC if this was the death of the EU, Juncker said, “No” and left. There was laughter and applause in the press room at this point. But the applause was mostly from EU officials.

James Crisp 24/06/201613:35

Joint statement by Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament, Mark Rutte, holder of the rotating Presidency of the Council of the EU, and Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission, on the outcome of the United Kingdom referendum

President Tusk, President Schulz and Prime Minister Rutte met this morning in Brussels upon the invitation of European Commission President Juncker. They discussed the outcome of the United Kingdom referendum and made the following joint statement:

“In a free and democratic process, the British people have expressed their wish to leave the European Union. We regret this decision but respect it. This is an unprecedented situation but we are united in our response. We will stand strong and uphold the EU’s core values of promoting peace and the well-being of its peoples. The Union of 27 Member States will continue. The Union is the framework of our common political future. We are bound together by history, geography and common interests and will develop our cooperation on this basis. Together we will address our common challenge to generate growth, increase prosperity and ensure a safe and secure environment for our citizens. The institutions will play their full role in this endeavour.

We now expect the United Kingdom government to give effect to this decision of the British people as soon as possible, however painful that process may be. Any delay would unnecessarily prolong uncertainty. We have rules to deal with this in an orderly way. Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union sets out the procedure to be followed if a Member State decides to leave the European Union. We stand ready to launch negotiations swiftly with the United Kingdom regarding the terms and conditions of its withdrawal from the European Union. Until this process of negotiations is over, the United Kingdom remains a member of the European Union, with all the rights and obligations that derive from this. According to the Treaties which the United Kingdom has ratified, EU law continues to apply to the full to and in the United Kingdom until it is no longer a Member.

As agreed, the “New Settlement for the United Kingdom within the European Union”, reached at the European Council on 18-19 February 2016, will now not take effect and ceases to exist. There will be no renegotiation. As regards the United Kingdom, we hope to have it as a close partner of the European Union also in the future. We expect the United Kingdom to formulate its proposals in this respect. Any agreement, which will be concluded with the United Kingdom as a third country, will have to reflect the interests of both sides and be balanced in terms of rights and obligations.”

James Crisp 24/06/201613:39

James Crisp 24/06/201613:41

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201613:53

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201613:59

Brussels, 24 June 2016

President Schulz, President Tusk and Prime Minister Rutte met this morning in Brussels upon the invitation of European Commission President Juncker. They discussed the outcome of the United Kingdom referendum and made the following joint statement: “In a free and democratic process, the British people have expressed their wish to leave the European Union. We regret this decision but respect it. This is an unprecedented situation but we are united in our response. We will stand strong and uphold the EU’s core values of promoting peace and the well-being of its peoples. The Union of 27 Member States will continue. The Union is the framework of our common political future. We are bound together by history, geography and common interests and will develop our cooperation on this basis. Together we will address our common challenges to generate growth, increase prosperity and ensure a safe and secure environment for our citizens. The institutions will play their full role in this endeavour. We now expect the United Kingdom government to give effect to this decision of the British people as soon as possible, however painful that process may be. Any delay would unnecessarily prolong uncertainty. We have rules to deal with this in an orderly way. Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union sets out the procedure to be followed if a Member State decides to leave the European Union. We stand ready to launch negotiations swiftly with the United Kingdom regarding the terms and conditions of its withdrawal from the European Union. Until this process of negotiations is over, the United Kingdom remains a member of the European Union, with all the rights and obligations that derive from this. According to the Treaties which the United Kingdom has ratified, EU law continues to apply to the full to and in the United Kingdom until it is no longer a Member. As agreed, the “New Settlement for the United Kingdom within the European Union”, reached at the European Council on 18-19 February 2016, will now not take effect and ceases to exist. There will be no renegotiation. As regards the United Kingdom, we hope to have it as a close partner of the European Union in the future. We expect the United Kingdom to formulate its proposals in this respect. Any agreement, which will be concluded with the United Kingdom as a third country, will have to reflect the interests of both sides and be balanced in terms of rights and obligations.”

James Crisp 24/06/201614:12

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201614:14

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:15

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:15

Brexit threatens to undo UK's Calais border deal

The bilateral agreement on the policing of the UK border on French territory could be one of the first victims of Brexit. EurActiv France reports.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 24/06/201614:25

British Commission official tells me:

I woke up to messages from all my friends. Honestly most people are just in shock. I was with all my colleagues, some British and some not, we had no idea what went wrong. Most of us went to bed when Remain was leading.

People are really upset. Some tears were shed, some people were crying. It has really hit people hard, both Brits and non-Brits.

For some they worry this is spelling the end of the EU, some Brits are wondering if it is the end of the UK. What the hell went wrong? Some are worried because of the uncertainty round the jobs.

We’ve been assured that the status of British officials will be honoured. They are saying, don’t worry you’ll be fine but some people are wondering how can you say that?

There are nationality quotas to be met and then if UK funding is pulled out? There will have to be cuts somewhere and we would be the obvious choice.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:35

Austria unlikely to follow UK, but calls for EU reform

The overall response in Austria to the result of the UK’s referendum has been to call for closer cooperation and to put the EU on the path to reform. EurActiv Germany reports.

EurActiv.com

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:50

A plea to the rest of Europe: Reform or face further exits

There is obviously no time to lose in absorbing the new reality facing the UK and urgently working to unite and heal its divided communities. It is time for reform, writes Jean Lambert.

EurActiv.com

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:51

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201614:51

EXCLUSIVE reporting by @JamesCrisp6

Tories 'plan November general election' to win Brexit government mandate

EXCLUSIVE / Britain’s ruling Conservative party is planning to hold fresh general elections in November, to secure a popular mandate for a new Brexit government.

EurActiv.com

James Crisp 24/06/201614:57

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201615:05

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201615:07

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201615:08

Brexit already having an impact on jobs and financial centres.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201615:32

Polish politicians are heavily disappointed by the results of the referendum. Foreign Minister Witold Waszczykowski called it “a bad result for Europe” and he estimated that the whole process of the UK leaving the European Union will take “2 to 15 years”.

Jarosław Kaczyński, the leader of the ruling Law and Justice party and the power behind Prime Minister Beata Szydło was also pessimistic. For him Brexit “is a very bad event” and he thinks that the EU should respond with a new treaty that will “also be an offer to the UK”. He considers that the EU currently behaves “arbitrarily” and the new treaty should guarantee “a rule based on law, with a clear distinction between responsibilities of the Union and of the Member States […] as well as increasing the number of decision areas in which consensus is required”.

In the wider Polish society there is an unease about the future of friends and family members who decided to emigrate to the UK. Their number is estimated at 800,000 people and, given the uncertainty about the future shape of the EU-UK relations, there is an anxiety about who would be able to stay – and what Poland will do if a significant number of people will come back from the UK.

Fringe groups on the populist far right joined the likes of Marine Le Pen and Geert Wilders and also are celebrating the Brexit results. The National Movement (it has a single MP in the parliament) has called for a similar referendum in Poland but this idea is not, at least for the moment, being treated seriously on the wider political scene.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201615:47

US reaction

The White House has released a statement in which it called “the special relationship” with the UK “enduring”. It also called the country’s membership of NATO “a vital cornerstone of US foreign, security and economic policy”.

The statement added that “the UK and the EU will remain indispensable partners even as they begin negotiating their ongoing relationship to ensure continued stability, security, and prosperity for Europe, Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the world”.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201615:50

Matthew Tempest 24/06/201615:58

Some interesting – but technical – points from an EU source on the legal logistics of what happens next.

The referendum itself does not constitute a legal notification – the UK government has to inform the EU Council, giving legal notice to withdraw under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

At that point, the “two-year” timetable for withdrawal kicks in.

It is legally *possible* – during those two years – that the 27+1 negotiating sides could agree an extension to that two years.

The legal notification from the UK government should come “as soon as possible” – but seemingly no legal definition of what that means.

What if there is no agreement within two years? “The treaties cease to apply.”

The European Parliament has to give its consent to the UK’s departure – and must be “fully informed during the negotiations.”

The status of EU institutional bodies headquartered within the UK is unclear. (“The location of agencies is an issue to be discussed in due course.”)

The size of the European Parliament post the departure of the UK’s 73 MEPs is unclear – whether the overall headcount would reduce, or other member states allowed more to keep the size the same. “The number of seats is determined by the treaties.”

The UK – during its remaining two years – can participate, with full rights in the Council EXCEPT for discussions of the Brexit.

The status of the one UK Commissioner? – “normal treaty rules apply until withdrawal applies.”

Scotland? “That is not a legal question arising now. The UK voted to withdraw – there is no other situation at this time.”

The UK’s withdrawal “implies withdrawal from the Euratom treaty.”

The status of the English language within the EU institutions? Unclear. “It is an official language *now*. It is the mother tongue of one member state, and one of the official languages of another member state. [Malta].”

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:01

Catalonia’s current leader has had his say on the referendum result.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:04

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:26

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:32

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:33

Samuel White 24/06/201616:35

Margaret Hodge, the Labour MP for Barking and Dagenham, submitted a motion of no confidence in Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, over his luke-warm performance campaigning for the Remain vote.

Samuel White 24/06/201616:36

Margaret Hodge, the Labour MP for Barking and Dagenham, submitted a motion of no confidence in Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, over his luke-warm performance campaigning for the Remain vote.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:42

“No good can come of this”

“It is a deeply historical moment, with unknown and unknowable outcomes,” explained Professor Brigid Laffan, Director of the European University Institute’s Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, referring to the UK’s historic decision to withdraw its membership from the European Union.

“The UK now shows itself a divided country”, she said. “It is divided internally, with Northern Ireland, Scotland and London having voted to remain; it is divided across educational and generational lines, it is divided between the industrial and financial sectors.”

She continued that: “what I find worrying is that this is the first country to make a historical decision based on the issue of immigration. The Leave supporters won not only the referendum, but also the campaign.” Professor Laffan also charged the centre parties to reassert themselves.

With regard to the EU itself, Laffan noted that the UK’s pragmatic culture and tradition of diplomacy will be missed. A more worrisome consequence of the UK’s exit will be the resulting disequilibrium among the remaining countries. With France a relatively weak power, she explained, the UK was an effective counter-balance to Germany’s strength.

“Having Germany as a single dominant power is unhealthy for the Union. It is the last thing that Germany wanted.”

However, she concluded that “More Europe is not the answer”. Rather, she hopes to see national governments reaffirm their commitment to the EU among their populaces. “Governments and politicians need to support EU institutions and make it clear to their voters that the EU is worth defending.”

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201616:45

Samuel White 24/06/201616:52

Gove praises Cameron’s leadership

Michael Gove this afternoon praised David Cameron’s “dignified” leadership and said he “deserves to be remembered as a great prime minister”.

Gove, tipped for high office in a post-Brexit cabinet, said that the process of divergence would be “gradual”, and that Britain’s “existing trading relationships with the European Union and the rest of the world will continue as before”.

“Britain is embarking on a new chapter, but one that is in line with our best traditions. […] We can build a new, stronger and more positive relationship with our European neighbours based on free trade and friendly cooperation,” he said.

Freddie Martyn 24/06/201617:00

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201617:06

Italian newspaper Gazzetta del Mezzogiorno definitely jumped the gun with its “Britain stays in the EU” front page this morning.

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201617:18

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201617:20

https://twitter.com/LouisAlexDore/status/746325151743086592

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201617:21

Brexit calls EU climate action into question as top MEP quits

The European Union’s plans to reform its broken carbon market have been thrown into turmoil, after the British lead MEP on the bill to revise the Emissions Trading System resigned after the UK voted to leave the bloc.

EurActiv.com

Samuel Morgan 24/06/201618:10

https://twitter.com/LouisAlexDore/status/746325151743086592

Samuel White 24/06/201618:20

Samuel White 24/06/201618:20

Samuel White 24/06/201618:23

French President François Hollande said on Twitter, “Today, history is knocking at our door, i will do all I can to make this a profound change and not a setback. A massive change is needed. In order to progress, Europe cannot go on like before.”

Dominique Ostyn 24/06/201619:01

That’s it from us on this historic day. Below the last wrap-up piece for today. http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/brexit-threatens-the-uk-the-eu-and-the-economy/

Thanks for reading us today. We will be back tomorrow and on Sunday with more updates. The whole EurActiv team.

Dominique Ostyn 24/06/201619:08

That’s it from us on this historic day! Thanks for reading us today. Below the last wrap-up piece for today. http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/brexit-threatens-the-uk-the-eu-and-the-economy/

We will be back tomorrow and on Sunday with further updates.

Sweet dreams from the whole EurActiv team!

Dominique Ostyn 24/06/201619:08

That’s it from us on this historic day Below the last wrap-up piece for today: http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/brexit-threatens-the-uk-the-eu-and-the-economy/

We will be back tomorrow and on Sunday with further updates.

Thanks for reading us today & sweet dreams from the whole EurActiv team!

Dominique Ostyn 25/06/201610:08

That’s it from us on this historic day. Below the last wrap-up piece for today.

http://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/brexit-threatens-the-uk-the-eu-and-the-economy Thanks for reading us today. We will be back tomorrow and on Sunday with more updates. The whole EurActiv team.

Dominique Ostyn 25/06/201610:11

That’s it from us on this historic day. Below the last wrap-up piece for today.

> Brexit threatens the UK, the EU and the economy

Thanks for reading us today. We will be back tomorrow and on Sunday with more updates. The EurActiv team.

Samuel Morgan 25/06/201614:06

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201610:30

SUNDAY 10.30am Shadow cabinet ‘coup’ against Corbyn?

Dramatic overnight events, with Britain’s Labour opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn, sacking his shadow Foreign Secretary Hillary Benn in the early hours of Sunday by phone after learning – according to the Observer – Benn was about to resign and force a leadership contest.

Benn claimed Corbyn would be unable to lead Labour to election victory – either in 2020 or as now appears more likely, in a possible post-Brexit election within months.

Several others – even up to half – of the shadow cabinet are poised to resign to force a leadership contest.

Which leaves Labour in a ‘unstoppable force hits immovable object’ dilemma. Corbyn has said he would stand again as leader, and has the backing of the vast majority of the 500,000 Labour members who voted for him only nine months ago.

What he doesn’t have, is the backing of Labour MPs in parliament, and a large part of his shadow cabinet.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201610:33

10.31am John Kerry to fly in to London for emergency talks.

According to AFP, the US Secretary of State has added Brussels and London to his current itinerary, as the post-Brexit ramifications continue.

Officials with Kerry on his plane in Rome told reporters that the two stops had been added at the last moment.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201611:01

11am

Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, speaking on the BBC, has just said that a second Scottish independence referendum is now “highly likely.”

She also made the – cunning – political formulation that a vote for independence would now be a vote for Remain.

Scotland voted, universally, to stay within the EU on Thursday.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201611:37

11.30am

Schulz calls for UK to begin Article 50 withdrawal immediately.

European Parliament President Martin Schulz told Bild am Sonntag today that David Cameron should notify the EU this week of Britain’s legal intention to leave the EU.

That would occur at the summit on Tuesday. Cameron has already announced he is resigning as prime minister, although not until October, when a new Conservative party leader can be elected.

Schulz said “Hesitating to simply accommodate the party tactics of the British conservatives hurts everyone.

“That is why we expect the British government to now deliver. The summit on Tuesday is the right time.”

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201613:18

Expats begin looking for Plan B after Brexit

Many Europeans have benefitted from the right to live and work across the EU. Large numbers of British and French citizens that have crossed the Channel are now worried about their future in their adopted home. EurActiv France reports.

EurActiv.com

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201613:18

Spain votes in general election, amid post-Brexit chaos

Just days after a shock Brexit, Spaniards were voting on Sunday in repeat elections to decide if they too want a radical change as promised by a far-left coalition led by Podemos.

EurActiv.com

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201613:18

Brussels Brits react in horror to Brexit: 'What the hell went wrong?'

The vote for Brexit has come as a huge shock to the British people living and working in Brussels, who “branded it “insane”, “stupid”, and asked, “what the hell went wrong?”

EurActiv.com

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201614:38

2.30pm

Two tweets from the Economics Editor of the Financial Times.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201614:40

Surreal, but true.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201614:42

2.45pm

Labour shadow cabinet resignations…so far.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201614:43

Clarification: In post below, Hilary Benn was actually sacked before he could resign.

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201615:50

Reports of racist unrest in post-Brexit UK

Police in London confirmed Sunday (26 June) they were investigating “racially motivated” damage to a Polish cultural centre, in the wake of Britain’s Brexit vote, as other citizens used social media to self-report incidents of racist abuse.

 

EurActiv.com

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201616:51

UK in political turmoil as Corbyn under pressure after Cameron quits

Britain’s Labour opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn was faced with the resignation or dismissal of at least seven of his shadow cabinet on Sunday (26 June) in the wake of the Brexit vote – just 48 hours after Prime Minister David Cameron announced his own resignation.

EurActiv.com

Matthew Tempest 26/06/201619:38

A “senior EU official” has just given a 60-minute briefing to the Brussels press corps…

Some immediate key points.

The same senior EU official also later called the UK crisis “very” serious.

Other ‘takeaways’, were that several EU member states have Brexit taskforces already set up – unlike, seemingly, the UK.

No clarification if triggering Article 50 could wait until/beyond David Cameron’s leadership replacement, let alone any snap election later in 2016, so possibly pushing trigger into early 2017. “Nothing to add – at dinner on Tuesday night, the question of timeline will be discussed.”

There was no specific mention of the threats to the markets on Monday morning.

The discussion the UK result will take up dinner on Tuesday night – a presentation from Cameron – and all Wednesday.

The 27 ‘sherpas’ met in Brussels on Sunday afternoon to discuss the summit – the UK sherpa was not invited.

There will be no negotiations between the 27 and UK “before legal notice is sent.”

Samuel Morgan 27/06/201610:37

As the fallout from Brexit continues, follow our new live blog, where you can expect more of the same high-quality reporting and analysis from the EurActiv team.

As it happened: First EU summit post-Brexit

Following the UK’s historic decision to leave the EU, member states convened in Brussels to begin the unprecedented decision of discussing the terms of its divorce. Follow EurActiv’s live blog below for all the developments as they happened.

EurActiv.com