Commission ‘analyses’ Poland's complaint over Russian food ban

  
The WTO in Geneva

The European Commission responded cautiously, today, to a Polish request to lodge a formal complaint to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) over a Russian ban on EU food products that has hit Poland particularly hard.

Poland's economy ministry told Reuters it had sent the request to European Trade Commissioner Karel De Gucht, who represents EU members in all WTO cases.

After a meeting with the Commissioner on 19 August, Poland's Agriculture Minister Marek Sawicki said that preliminary EU consultations were under way and that the first decisions on the lawsuit could be made as soon as 12 September.

The Russian food ban was imposed in response to Western economic sanctions against Russia over its annexation of Crimea from Ukraine and a pro-Russian rebellion in eastern Ukraine that Western capitals accuse Moscow of fomenting.

>> Read: Moscow retaliates with import ban on EU, US food

Total food exports to Russia were worth around $1.5 billion (€1.13 billion) last year.

But the commission is keeping its cards close to its chest regarding how it intends to comply with the Polish request.

“We received this letter from the Polish, we are now looking at it, we are looking at what is possible and what is not possible under WTO rules, before we take any decision,” said Commission spokesperson Chantal Hughes.

She added: “Of course, we will discuss with all relevant member states and stakeholders. When we’ve done that, we will make a decision. We’re not there yet, but we will make a decision in the coming weeks.”

According to Reuters, the European Commission has so far been cautious about taking the embargo case to the WTO, with lawyers in Brussels advising that doing so could escalate the conflict with Russia over Ukraine.

On 8 April, the Commission opened a WTO dispute against the Russian embargo on EU pork imposed earlier this year.

>> Read: EU takes Russia to WTO over pork embargo

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Comments

Jay's picture

If this weekend's visit by German Chancellor Merkel to Kyiv proves fruitful none of this will matter.

A report in "The Independent" says the plan would formally hand Crimea to Russia in exchange for a withdrawal of Kremlin support in Donbas and a long-term gas deal that would include compensation for revenues lost in Crimea, including rent for the Black Sea Fleet.

The deal would also forbid Moscow from future meddling in Kyiv's EU integration; Kyiv, in turn, would agree not to join NATO.