Mike Parr

Energy 20-07-2021

Europe’s hydrogen split: blue vs green and north vs south

The only element keeping blue hydrogen projects alive are subsidies and as green hydrogen declines in cost more government subsidies will be needed. This might be good for Shell and Exxon but is unlikely to be popular with voters, writes Mike Parr.
Electricity 22-01-2021

EU electricity markets: Fit for the renewable future or not?

There is growing recognition in the industry that Europe’s wholesale electricity markets will need to be reformed once again to allow higher shares of renewables in the power system, writes Mike Parr.
Energy 27-11-2020

What is the real cost of green hydrogen?

What is the real cost of green hydrogen? Is there a reliable and straightforward way to obtain this cost? What information is needed? Is it valid to compare green hydrogen prices with grey or blue hydrogen prices? Mike Parr and Simon Minett attempt to answer these questions.
Energy 25-09-2020

Meeting the 2030 emissions targets: Mission possible?

Meeting the European Commission’s proposed climate target for 2030 will require a step change in emission reduction – nearly trebling the existing effort – and a considerable ramp up in renewable energy production, write Mike Parr and Gabriel Benchetrit.
Energy 30-07-2020

EU’s hydrogen strategy a good start but key problems sidestepped

Europe’s hydrogen strategy mostly points in the right direction by identifying renewable hydrogen as a key energy vector and necessary storage solution for delivering a zero-carbon EU, but it side-steps several key problems that go to the core of what...
Energy 01-07-2020

The energy transition, electricity prices and hydrogen

Hydrogen from electrolysers is a 3-in-one energy carrier delivering three solutions to three important emergency energy transition problems, write Mike Parr and Simon Minett.

Diverting fossil fuel investments to renewables is not enough

Debate over the cost merits of fossil fuels against renewable power generation has traditionally focused on the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE), which has dropped dramatically in the case of wind and solar power. But that ignores the upfront capital costs, which are still up to seven times higher for renewables, writes Mike Parr.