Spain’s former king submits tax regularisation before national tax agency

The Supreme Court Prosecutor's Office is investigating the former king and some of his relatives - excluding King Felipe and Princess Letizia - for the alleged use of credit cards linked to current accounts of which he is not the holder. EFE/Sergio Barrenechea EPA-EFE/Sergio Barrenechea

Spain’s former king, Juan Carlos I, has submitted voluntarily to the Spanish tax agency (Agencia Tributaria) a tax regularisation statement, after local media reported extensively in recent months about alleged tax fraud cases said to be related to the former king, El País reported on Sunday.

Four months after Juan Carlos I left Spain for Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates, his lawyer, Javier Sánchez-Junco, had sent the letter to the tax agency with the aim of regularising the former king’s fiscal situation.

The letter is currently being analysed by the tax agency, which must respond within the next few days.

The agency will either accept the regularisation process or request more information. Ultimately, it will decide how much Spain’s former king will have to pay up.

Alleged use of opaque credit cards

However, the tax declaration sent to the tax agency is not related to Juan Carlos’s alleged assets abroad. Rather, it is linked to the alleged use of bank cards with opaque funds by the former king and some members of the Spanish royal family.

These opaque funds allegedly come from Mexican businessman Allen Sanginés-Krause, a friend of the former monarch who is being investigated by the Supreme Court’s Attorney General, El País and EFE reported.

The Supreme Court Prosecutor’s Office is investigating the former king and some of his relatives – excluding King Felipe and Princess Letizia – for the alleged use of credit cards linked to current accounts of which he is not the holder.

The money belonged to Sanginés-Krause, who allegedly donated it to Juan Carlos I but the former king failed to declare it to the Spanish tax agency.

The facts date back to 2016 and 2018, following the abdication in June 2014 of Juan Carlos I, which led to his loss of immunity granted by the Spanish Constitution.

Spanish monarch relinquishes throne

Spain’s King Juan Carlos said on Monday he would abdicate in favor of his more popular son Prince Felipe, in an apparent bid to revive the scandal-hit monarchy at a time of economic hardship and growing discontent with the wider political elite.

Kickbacks for a contract with Saudi Arabia?

The possibility by Juan Carlos I to submit a voluntary tax declaration and regularise his situation with the Spanish treasury has been circulating since the former king’s ex-lover Corinna Larsen declared that he had given her €65 million as a gift, from a “donation” made to him by the King of Arabia Saudi, Abdullah bin Abdelaziz, EFE had reported.

Spain’s former king is the target of a probe into alleged kickbacks for a contract to build a high -speed train (Spain’s “AVE”) to the Mecca, from where, according to Spanish media reports, the €65 million allegedly come from.

The amount defrauded would exceed the €120,000 limit in some years, which is considered a “tax offence”, punishable by up to five years in prison.

For Juan Carlos to be guilty of a “tax offence”, the undeclared amount must exceed €278,000, according to estimates from tax agency experts quoted by Spanish media on Sunday.

[Edited by Daniel Eck/Zoran Radosavljevic]

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