Czechia plans LNG imports from the Baltic Sea by train

The new facility is not the only plan for importing LNG to the landlocked country. In early May, Prime Minister Petr Fiala said after a meeting with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz that Czechia would negotiate with Germany on the joint use of LNG gas terminals that the German government wants to build. [Shutterstock/Maksim Safaniuk]

Czech state fuel distributor Čepro is ready to build a liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal in the country, so gas could be transported from the Baltic Sea by train.

In the future, ship transport is also possible if the navigability of the Elbe River is resolved.

Planned LNG transhipment facility is one of the potential steps to increase Czech energy security, Čepro Director František Todt told a conference organised by the parliamentary economic and security committee on Wednesday (11 May). Čepro is 100% owned by the Czech finance ministry.

The new facility is not the only plan for importing LNG to the landlocked country. In early May, Prime Minister Petr Fiala said after a meeting with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz that Czechia would negotiate with Germany on the joint use of LNG gas terminals that the German government wants to build.

Like other European countries, the Czech Republic wants to be independent of Russian energy. While the government is trying to find alternatives, natural gas supplies from Russia continue to flow for the time being.

“Gas supplies to the Czech Republic are continuous and domestic reservoirs are filling up at a rate of over 25 million cubic metres per day, which corresponds to about twice the daily consumption in summer,” said Industry and Trade Minister Jozef Sikela.

According to Síkela, the Czech Republic has not been affected by the Ukrainian authorities’ announcement on Wednesday (11 May) to stop gas supplies via the Ukrainian station Sochranovka.

About 99% of gas supplies to the Czech Republic are imported from Russia via Germany.

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