Logar says resolution on Slovenia ‘political document’

Slovenian Minister of Foreign Affairs Anze Logar. [EPA-EFE/GIUSEPPE LAMI]

The resolution on the rule of law in Slovenia that the European Parliament will vote on later this week is a political document which does not require special attention, Foreign Minister Anže Logar said in Brussels on Monday. He said the MEPs’ November debate on this topic had proven no great interest in the document.

If endorsed on Thursday, the resolution will express concern over deep polarisation in Slovenia and call on prominent public figures and politicians to ensure a respectful and civilised public debate.

It was filed by four political groups – the Socialists (S&D), Liberals (Renew), Greens and the Left. In contrast, the largest group, the European People’s Party (EPP), which is the European political family of Slovenian PM Janez Janša, did not sign-on.

Unofficial information shows the EPP had tried to have it withdrawn from the December plenary because the two main reasons for it – the non-appointment of European delegated prosecutors and the funding of the STA – have been addressed.

The fact that the vote will still be held in the Parliament while the Slovenian government has eliminated what led to the criticism during Slovenia’s EU presidency “shows this document is political in nature because we know the Parliament is a political body”, said Logar.

The resolution thus “needs no special additional attention”, he told Slovenian reporters in Brussels, speaking via video link. “After all, we could see in the last debate, at which I was personally present, that there was no major interest in this resolution”, said Logar, who will travel to Strasbourg for the plenary after today’s session of EU foreign ministers in Brussels.

He said Slovenia was committed to the rule of law, which it had proved during the EU presidency. “We’ve proved even to the biggest of doubters that we know how to seek and reach a consensus in the right way. This is the best answer to those who want to keep exporting internal political topics to the EU political arena.”

As to Prime Minister Janša not coming to Strasbourg to present the achievements of Slovenia’s EU presidency as it draws to an end, Logar was asked whether he would present them in January.

“By handing over the presidency to France, Slovenia will no longer be presenting its achievements, but the French presidency will be building on the Slovenian presidency’s successes,” he said.

Logar moreover noted the Slovenian presidency had managed to harmonise positions with the European Parliament in 16 trilogues, which he said was the upper limit of what had been the most optimistic scenarios.

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