Moldovan president says coalition government may collapse

File photo. The President of Moldova Igor Dodon congrats the new elected Mayor of Chisinau Ion Ceban (R) after the announcement of the preliminary results of second round of local elections at Socialist's Party headquarter in Chisinau, Moldova, 3 November 2019. [Dumitru Doru/EPA/EFE]

Moldovan President Igor Dodon said on Thursday (7 November) the former Soviet republic’s coalition government could collapse following a move by the prime minister to take on powers to nominate the prosecutor general.

A special commission under the justice ministry had been expected to select the next prosecutor general, but Prime Minister Maia Sandu said on Wednesday she wanted to be able to personally make the choice.

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Moldova’s new prime minister Maia Sandu consolidated her power on Friday (14 June) as her predecessor resigned, appearing to ease a crisis that shook the country for the past week as two rival governments jostled for control.

The move, outlined in draft legislation, is an attempt to strengthen Sandu’s ability to fight corruption, one of her government’s main tasks. But it has split the government, as it faces opposition from her Socialist coalition partners.

Dodon, who was the Socialist party leader before he became president, wrote on Facebook that he had urged Sandu to change her mind and discussed the situation with the ambassadors of the United States, Russia and the European Union.

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Moldova’s president said today (17 January) he hoped the ex-Soviet state’s Association Agreement with the European Union would be cancelled if his party obtains a parliamentary majority, paving the way for an alliance with Moscow.

He said he had informed the envoys “about the risks associated with the possible resignation of the government of the Republic of Moldova.”

But Sandu, a Harvard-educated former World Bank economist, told a local television station that she was standing firm.

She said “we will not withdraw this initiative. And if the Socialist party considers the decision as unconstitutional, it is their right.”

Parliament is due to meet on Friday and discuss the legislation, which can be blocked by a majority of deputies.

He said he had informed the envoys “about the risks associated with the possible resignation of the government of the Republic of Moldova.”

But Sandu, a Harvard-educated former World Bank economist, told a local television station that she was standing firm.

She said “we will not withdraw this initiative. And if the Socialist party considers the decision as unconstitutional, it is their right.”

Parliament is due to meet on Friday and discuss the legislation, which can be blocked by a majority of deputies.

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