Berlin labels Russian ministry’s video on Hitler-Stalin Pact ‘disgraceful’

On Tuesday, the English-language Twitter account of Russia’s foreign affairs ministry posted what it called an “informational video” to “mark 83 years” since the signing of the non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. [Shutterstock/vicspacewalker]

The German government has slammed Russia’s foreign ministry for a video posted on social media ‘marking’ the 83rd anniversary of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

“I would classify this [statement] as disgraceful,” chief government spokesperson Steffen Hebestreit told reporters in Berlin on Wednesday.

On Tuesday, the English-language Twitter account of Russia’s foreign affairs ministry posted what it called an “informational video” to “mark 83 years” since the signing of the non-aggression pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, unofficially known as the Hitler-Stalin pact, was signed in 1939 and stipulated mutual non-interference but was terminated in June 1941, when Germany invaded the Soviet Union.

However, the Russian ministry’s video leaves out key information on the pact and its context.

For example, it disregards the fact that the pact included secret protocols setting out how Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union intended to split Poland and the Baltics between them into “spheres of interest,” paving the way for Poland’s invasion by both Hitler and Stalin mere weeks later – and the start of the Second World War.

“Moreover, I would like to completely dismiss any comparison or parallels insinuated here,” Hebestreit added.

Hebestreit said he was “not surprised” at the Russian ministry’s conduct.

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