Berlin promises money for ‘Marshall plan’ to help rebuild Ukraine

“Our solidarity with our European neighbour is permanent – this is why we need an international Marshall plan for Ukraine,” the liberal FDP minister told lawmakers, referring to the Marshall plan launched after the Second World War to help rebuild Western Europe. [EPA-EFE/JOERG CARSTENSEN / POOL]

Germany is earmarking funds for a long-term ‘Marshall Plan’ to help rebuild Ukraine after the war ends, Finance Minister Christian Lindner announced on Tuesday during his presentation of the national budget for 2022.

“Our solidarity with our European neighbour is permanent – this is why we need an international Marshall Plan for Ukraine,” the liberal FDP minister told lawmakers, referring to the Marshall Plan launched after the Second World War to help rebuild Western Europe and floated by multiple EU leaders in recent weeks.

“We hope that peace will be restored soon. Once this is the case, we will still be there to help rebuild, work towards a good future, and to support the path towards a partnership with the EU,” he added.

Lindner also announced that the government would soon table a supplementary budget to account for measures taken in reaction to the war, including aid and steps to alleviate the resulting price increases on critical goods like energy.

The government launched a similar supplementary spending package concerning the COVID-19 pandemic at the end of last year. The war in Ukraine makes for “another exceptional situation”, making a second package now necessary, Lindner argued.

At the same time, he stressed the importance of “going to normal” in budgetary terms, which translates to going back to budgetary discipline in Germany. From 2023 onwards, Germany will return to observing the national debt limit, which had been suspended during the past few years due to the pandemic, Lindner also announced.

“After all, we hope that there will not be any emergency situation anymore next year,” he said.

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