Croatia summons Austrian ambassador over ‘fundamental human freedoms’ in Vienna

President Zoran Milanović said his office would summon the Austrian ambassador to convey his concern over “fundamental human freedoms” in that country. [Shutterstock / Aritra Deb]

President Zoran Milanović said his office would summon the Austrian ambassador to convey his concern over “fundamental human freedoms”. He also said if the Dutch can comment on Bosnia and Herzegovina every week, he can comment on the situation in Rotterdam.

Austria summoned the Croatian ambassador on 18 November after Milanović commented on the Austrian government’s anti-COVID-19 measures, noting that they were reminiscent of fascism.

“Comparing the measures against the coronavirus pandemic to fascism is unacceptable. It is our responsibility to protect the citizens of Austria, and we are acting accordingly,” APA news agency quoted the Austrian ministry as saying.

“Our ambassadors are constantly summoned over some nonsense, so we will summon theirs,” the president said.

Commenting on the latest developments, Milanović said some Western European countries kept criticising Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and the Poles, while some of them behave as if they are “sacred cows that do everything perfectly”.

“No, it’s stupid. It is not scientific, and you terrorise people. Given that this is the European Union and I am a European statesman, I have a problem with that,” Milanović said.

He went on to say that if the Dutch can comment on Bosnia and Herzegovina every week, he can comment on the situation in Rotterdam.

“Your people have revolted (against COVID measures). Not immigrants but blond and blue-eyed Dutchmen. Use your head, gentlemen,” Milanović said, referring to violent riots in that Dutch city over the weekend.

Commenting on increasingly stringent restrictions being imposed to stop the spread of coronavirus, Milanović accused “dull-witted” Eurocrats in Brussels of such policy, adding that no such restrictions are in place in the Scandinavian countries.

(Željko Trkanjec | EURACTIV.hr)

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