Czechia asks Commission to rethink new emissions standards for cars

In a letter seen by EURACTIV.cz, Havlíček argues that the proposal of new emissions standards has to be proportional, cost-beneficial, and feasible. [shutterstock/NadyGinzburg]

Upcoming Euro 7 emission standards regulation for all petrol and diesel vehicles “seems to be almost impossible to implement”, Czech Deputy Prime Minister Karel Havlíček complained in a letter to the European Commission.

In the letter, seen by EURACTIV.cz, Havlíček argued that the proposal of new emissions standards has to be proportional, cost-beneficial, and feasible. Otherwise, the only result will be the limited offer of new vehicles and a significant increase in vehicle prices, Havlíček wrote in the letter, addressed to European Commission Vice-president Frans Timmermans and Commissioner Thierry Breton.

The European Commission will propose Euro 7 by the end of 2021. According to automotive industry, the planned regulation could literally kill off combustion engine cars from 2025 – which is 10 years before the proposed ban on new fossil-fuel cars sales outlined in the EU’s Fit for 55 package.

According to the Czech government, stricter regulation and higher prices of new vehicles will force people to keep their old cars – a scenario that could even have a negative impact on the environment.

“Adopting both Euro 7 regulation and strengthening the CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and new light commercial vehicles in the same short timeframe, without a thorough assessment of their combined effects, threatens to have a detrimental impact on both consumers and the car industry,” said the deputy PM in charge of industry, trade and transport.

(Aneta Zachová | EURACTIV.cz)

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