Encrypted copies of state databases stored outside Lithuania

Data security will also be guaranteed by the amendments to the Law on the Management of State Information Resources adopted by the Lithuanian parliament on Thursday, which will allow more flexible and efficient management of data stored by state institutions. [Shutterstock/RoBird]

Encrypted copies of the most important state databases are being stored not only in Lithuania but also in one of the data centres in a NATO country for the first time in history.

Data security will also be guaranteed by the amendments to the Law on the Management of State Information Resources adopted by the Lithuanian parliament on Thursday, which will allow more flexible and efficient management of data stored by state institutions.

“Today, digital Lithuania is more secure and open than ever before – we are starting to use not only our own infrastructure but also that of other countries,” said Economy and Innovation Minister Aušrinė Armonaitė.

“This means that in critical cases, the digital state will be able to continue to operate – we will be able to use copies of data abroad, no matter what happens to the servers in Lithuania,” she continued.

Data backups of the most important national databases are already stored in one of NATO’s data centres. More than 1,000 terabytes of the most critical data for Lithuania, such as the Register of Residents of the Republic of Lithuania, the Real Estate Register and Cadastre, the Address Register and other data, have been transferred there.

Commenting on the amendments, Deputy Economy and Innovation Minister Eglė Markevičiūtė emphasised that “this law will allow more flexible and efficient management of state information resources using both state and commercial data centres and services provided by the public cloud”.

“Institutional data will be classified according to importance and sensitivity, and their storage locations will be diversified, which will help protect our state from cyber attacks or other threats and ensure the smooth functioning of state institutions,” Markevičiūtė added.

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