Farmers paid to protect soil during winter in new post-Brexit subsidy regime

Farmers will receive between £20 and £58 per hectare in England to protect and nurture their soils. [Shutterstock/BasPhoto]

Having left the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy, the UK government has set up its own farm subsidy system that is designed to offer “public money for public goods.

This means that payments will only be for protecting species, planting trees and hedges, cutting greenhouse gas emissions, and protecting watercourses and the soil.

Farmers will receive between £20 and £58 per hectare in England to protect and nurture their soils.

Launching the scheme on Thursday, Environment Secretary George Eustice said that the government’s priorities were “to halt the decline in species abundance by 2030; to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions; to plant up to 10,000 hectares of trees per year in England, to improve water quality; to create more space for nature in the farmed landscape; and to ensure that we have a vibrant and profitable food and farming industry.”

Geoff Sansome, head of agriculture at Natural England, told Farming Weekly that farmers would view the offer as limited, but it was “not the finished product” and “more to follow”. (Benjamin Fox | EURACTIV.com)

Subscribe to our newsletters

Subscribe