German conservatives reach historic low ahead of elections

The historic low in polls marks yet another blow in what has been a rough month for conservative chancellor hopeful Armin Laschet. [EPA-EFE/CLEMENS BILAN]

The German Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU) have sunk below 20% approval among voters for the first time in Germany’s postwar history, according to a Forsa poll published on Tuesday. The Social Democrats (SPD), led by the vice-chancellor and finance minister, Olaf Scholz, are leading the polls with about 25%.

At the same time, the Greens are polling at 17% and the Liberal FDP has risen by one point to 13%. The far-right AfD polls at 11% and the leftist Die Linke at 6%.

This means that no two-party alliance would have a majority to form a government after the 26 September election – neither red-green nor the grand coalition nor a liberal black-yellow one.

Several three-way alliances would be possible after the election with the current numbers – a left-wing alliance (SPD-Greens-Die Linke), a traffic light coalition (SPD-Greens-FDP), and the option of CDU-Greens-FDP or SPD-CDU-FDP.

The historic low in polls marks yet another blow in what has been a rough month for conservative chancellor hopeful Armin Laschet.

The continuously low polling numbers of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative bloc have resulted in her stepping up the campaign game, praising Laschet as an important guarantor of stability during the German parliament’s last regular debate session, all the while lashing out at Scholz.

“What is at stake are real economic and tax-related decisions that will determine the future of our country, the number of jobs,” Merkel said, adding that Laschet was the only candidate capable of forming “a moderate government that will lead our country into the future”.

Merkel also criticised Scholz for using the term “guinea pigs” to describe people vaccinated against COVID-19.

(Nikolaus J. Kurmayer  | EURACTIV.de)

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