In Sweden, forming a new government takes more time than expected

Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson has been given additional time to find support in parliament to form a government. [EPA-EFE / Fredrik Persson]

Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson has been given additional time to find support in parliament to form a government. Parliament Speaker Andreas Norlén has granted an extension until noon on 22 November.

Last week, Ms Andersson succeeded Stefan Löfven as the Chair of the Social Democratic Party. In order to continue with the previous minority government coalition with the Green Party, and become the country’s first female Prime Minister, she would also need the silent backing of two small opposition parties to govern with the 349-seat Parliament

The Green Party is ready to continue in the government and Ms Andersson has secured the support of the opposition Center Party.

With the Left Party, there are ongoing negotiations and a deal looks very likely. According to the Left Party website, “the country does not need more governmental crises and the party has engaged itself in constructive discussions with Magdalena Andersson”. The focus of the party is on improving the lives of pensioners.

The Associated Press, also following the developments, has quoted the Left Party Chair, Mehrnoosh ”Nooshi” Dadgostar, saying that the discussions have continued “in good spirits”.

In Sweden, the political map formerly divided into clear left and right blocks has fragmented during the last decade or so. That is particularly the case on the right where there is strong reluctance to cooperate with the populist Sweden Democrats party. Consequently, forming a right-wing government has become difficult if not impossible.

(Pekka Vänttinen | EURACTIV.com)

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