Italy, EU’s least-efficient judicial system

A constant in Italy is the slowness in the resolution of trials, which sees an average of over 500 days for the first sentence, almost 800 for the appeal and 1,300 for the final judgment of the Supreme Court, the report states. [Shutterstock/ ErenMotion]

Italy is the worst country in the EU in terms of efficiency of justice, according to the EU justice scoreboard published by the European Commission on Thursday, which provides comparative data on efficiency, quality and independence of the judicial systems of all member states.

A constant in Italy is the slowness in the resolution of trials, which sees an average of over 500 days for the first sentence, almost 800 for the appeal and 1,300 for the final judgment of the Supreme Court, the report states.

According to the justice scoreboard, the countryis also behind in the number of pending cases and for judges per 100,000 inhabitants, while it is at the top of the ranking for the number of lawyers. Administrative justice also remains one of the slowest in Europe, better only than Malta and Portugal.

“The reduction of arrears in civil and commercial cases is an important positive signal,” said EU Justice Commissioner Didier Reynders, stressing, however, that waiting times are still very long and far from the European average.

The day the report was released, the Italian Council of Ministers approved the reform of the criminal trial proposed by Justice Minister Marta Cartabia.

The project provides an introduction of a maximum term within which the second and third-degree process must be celebrated, the introduction of some limits to the possibility of appeal, and the codification of transparent and predetermined priority criteria for the processes to be celebrated – a matter so far governed only by internal circulars of the individual prosecutors’ offices. (Alessandro Follis and Daniele Lettig | EURACTIV.it)

Subscribe to our newsletters

Subscribe