Montenegrin government takes stance on Srebrenica genocide following US calls

“The Embassy is concerned with comments casting doubt about what occurred in Srebrenica in 1995. We look for clarity and hope the government will unequivocally condemn the massacre and call it what it was – genocide,” the US Embassy in Podgorica, along with those in the Netherlands and Bulgaria, said on Twitter on Sunday. [Shutterstock/as-artmedia]

Montenegro’s government on Monday issued a statement after the US Embassy to Podgorica had called on the government to take a clear stance on 1995’s Srebrenica genocide following Justice Minister Vladimir Leposavić’s comments, saying he would only accept that genocide had occurred there if this had been unequivocally established, Hina reported.  

“The government led by Prime Minister Zdravko Krivokapić respects […] the Declaration of Acceptance of the Resolution of the European Parliament adopted by the Parliament of Montenegro in 2009, which condemns the crime of genocide in Srebrenica committed in 1995, as well as all other war crimes committed during the conflict in the former Yugoslavia,” the statement said. 

“The Embassy is concerned with comments casting doubt about what occurred in Srebrenica in 1995. We look for clarity and hope the government will unequivocally condemn the massacre and call it what it was – genocide,” the US Embassy in Podgorica, along with those in the Netherlands and Bulgaria, said in a statement posted to Twitter on Sunday. 

Minister Leposavić said he did not know whether the war criminals in Srebrenica had genocidal intent or not adding that in his eyes the UN court in the Hague had lost its legitimacy after the evidence of the Council of Europe rapporteur on trafficking in organs from Serbian civilians killed during the war in Kosovo was destroyed. 

Following these events, the Montenegrin government also said it “neither wants nor can change the decisions of international courts, nor can it declare some nations genocidal and others holy, because that is contrary to the principle that every crime is individual, that it has specific perpetrators and, unfortunately, specific victims and those specific individuals always answer for such crimes,” adding that it “condemns all crimes committed by anyone and stands in solidarity with the families of all victims of any crime.” (Željko Trkanjec | EURACTIV.hr)

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