Slovenia finally eases restrictions as Omicron wave recedes

Passengers entering Slovenia no longer need a COVID pass, and there is no quarantine requirement, not even for those in contact with an infected person [EPA-EFE/Enric Fontcuberta]

Slovenia lifted many major COVID-19 restrictions over the weekend, bringing them broadly in line with countries that opted to start reopening public life several weeks ago.

Passengers entering Slovenia no longer need a COVID pass, and there is no quarantine requirement, not even for those in contact with an infected person after the government declared that COVID-19 was no longer a disease that requires quarantine measures.

While students are still required to wear masks during class, they will no longer need to self-test. As a result, free self-tests and mass rapid testing will no longer be available.

The COVID pass mandate has been discontinued for all activities except in healthcare institutions, care homes and prisons. The cap on the number of customers in services businesses has also been lifted.

Under restrictions imposed last November, bars, cafes and restaurants were allowed to serve customers at tables between 5 am and 10 pm provided they had a valid COVID pass. Night clubs were closed.

Economy Minister Zdravko Počivalšek said the government opted for a “balanced approach” to keep protecting those at the highest risk while at the same time allowing life to resume as normal as possible.

“We have heeded calls from business to the extent that the medical experts have allowed us,” said the minister.

People are still advised to exert caution. “The economy can function efficiently and intensively only if the employees are healthy,” he added.

Slovenia has experienced a severe Omicron wave, but cases have rapidly receded in the past two weeks. The country has gone from a peak 14-day notification rate of more than 9,000 in early February to under 4,000 now, whereas hospitals, though quite full, never came close to capacity.

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