Swedish government loses no-confidence vote

The parties have been given a week to assess the situation and either call a snap election or have a caretaker government with or without Löfven until next year’s elections. [EPA-EFE/Mika Schmidt]

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven’s minority government of Social Democrats and Greens lost a no-confidence vote in parliament on Monday, the first time in Sweden’s history a prime minister has been ousted by parliament.

The parties have been given a week to assess the situation and either call a snap election or have a caretaker government with or without Löfven until next year’s elections.

The minority government’s preliminary proposal to reform the heavily regulated rent markets in a bid to ease the chronic housing shortage led the Left Party to withdraw its silent support from the prime minister. The populist Sweden Democrats instigated a vote of no-confidence in which, of the 349 MPs, 181 voted in favour.

The result also marks the end of a political landscape dominated by blocs on the right and left.

In a press conference, Löfven referred to a new political landscape in Sweden where to his “amazement” a party on the left can join forces with the extreme right. He also strongly criticised the Left Party saying that it has no alternative proposition for the rent market reform and its only purpose was to topple the government.

“Now everyone needs to compromise, since the country cannot afford a situation like the one after the 2018 elections when forming a government took four months,” Löfven concluded.

(Pekka Vänttinen | EURACTIV.com)

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