Zelenskyy rejects Poland’s proposal of peacekeeping mission

“I do not really understand this proposal. We do not need a frozen conflict, and I explained that at the meeting with our Polish colleagues. I know they continued this rhetoric,” Zelenskyy told Russian media. [EPA-EFE/STEPHANIE LECOCQ]

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy expressed scepticism about the proposal put forward by Poland’s ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party leader Jarosław Kaczyński of a peacekeeping mission in Ukraine, which he doubts could help solve the conflict with Russia.

Kaczyński first proposed a NATO-led peacekeeping mission during the recent visit to Kyiv with Prime Ministers of Poland, Czechia and Slovenia.

Poland then attempted to convince its NATO allies during last week’s NATO summit, but the idea did not fly since it would require securing such a mission with boots on the ground, which has been excluded from the very beginning.

“I do not really understand this proposal. We do not need a frozen conflict, and I explained that at the meeting with our Polish colleagues. I know they continued this rhetoric,” Zelenskyy told Russian media.

“Fortunately, the country still belongs to us, and I am its president, so it is up to us to decide whether there will be any (foreign) forces here,” he added.

The Ukrainian president’s comment resonated in Polish politics, with the opposition largely criticising its pursuit. Civic Coalition (KO) senator Marcin Bosacki criticised the government for pursuing Kaczyński’s idea “in spite of US’ irritation and against Ukraine itself.”

Government’s spokesman Michał Dworczyk declared on Monday that the idea is no longer on the table, and would not harm the relations between Warsaw and Kyiv.

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