About: participatory budgeting

The Scottish take on participatory budgeting

In 2017, Scottish councils agreed to spend 1% of their budgets through participatory budgeting (PB). But how does the process work in Scotland and what are the obstacles authorities and communities face when they carry it out? As part of...

Should European citizens dictate the bloc’s budget?

MEPs and experts propose to scale up a city-level tool allowing citizens to decide how to spend a part of the municipal resources and let Europeans shape the EU budget expenditure.

The Dutch and participatory budgeting: citizens have their say

Out of every region in the word, cities in Europe engage in the largest share of participatory budgeting, a process that allows citizens to weigh in on municipal budget expenditure and propose initiatives for their cities or neighborhoods. City leaders...

Participatory budgeting: Europe’s bet to increase trust in government

Participatory budgeting (PB) - the shared decision between city leaders and inhabitants on spending a part of the municipal budget - is becoming an increasingly popular democratic tool in Europe.

Participatory budgeting explained

Participatory budgeting, the shared decision between local government and citizens on how to spend a part of the municipal budget, is becoming increasingly popular across the bloc.

Cities’ empowerment initiatives risk being ‘paper exercises’, experts warn

Projects meant to give power to EU city dwellers risk being reduced to a 'box-ticking' exercise unless municipal leaders can convince as many of their constituents as possible to participate.

Boosting citizen engagement might not be enough to save democracy

To fight democratic backsliding and strengthen local democracy, cities have developed creative tools to boost citizen engagement, such as participatory budgeting and regional consultations. These forms of public participation are meant to bring democracy closer to citizens, giving them a...

Digital divide hinders European citizens’ voice in local matters

European cities are using online tools to engage their inhabitants, but a lack of digital skills and access could amplify existing inequalities.