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Climate change 11-04-2006

Fluorinated gases and climate change

EU lawmakers in January 2006 struck an agreement on a proposal to cut down emissions of fluorinated gases as part of the Kyoto protocol on climate change. F-gases are widely used in refrigeration and air conditioning but have a high global warming potential and can sometimes stay in the atmosphere for thousands of years. The agreement mainly seeks to improve the containment and recovery of F-gases and imposes regular checks on industrial refrigeration installations. After much discussion, the compromise allows countries like Denmark and Austria to maintain stricter controls than elsewhere in Europe until 2012. A phase-out of HFC-134a in car air conditioning has also been approved as of 2011 with a complete ban applying from 2017.

US environment agency gives climate protection award to the Commission

The 'F-gas team' at the Commission's DG environment was rewarded for the open way in which it handled the phase out of greenhouse gases in cars' air conditioning systems.

New rules on F-gases adopted as bill goes through Parliament

F-gases in cars' air conditioning systems are to be banned from 2014, but will be maintained in refrigerators and other home equipment. Environmentalists say Parliament bowed to industry pressures.

Proposed ban on F-gases gets cool reception

The ban on fluorinated gases (F-gases) proposed by the Parliament's environment committee has left industry concerned and NGOs only mildly happy.
Climate change 17-02-2004

MEPs consider possible ban on fluorinated gases in car’s air conditioning systems

The Parliament's Environment Committee will be examining a draft regulation on fluorinated gases with global warming effects on 17 February. The draft has been tightened to include a ban on their use in cars by 2011.
Development Policy 17-04-2002

Industry worried about plans to control fluorinated gases

A stakeholder workshop, hosted by the European Fluorocarbon industry, discussed possible plans by the European Commission to regulate the use of fluorinated gases on 16 April. In an open and transparent debate, the representatives of European Fluorocarbon Technical Committee (EFCTC) and the European Partnership for Energy and the Environment (EPEE) expressed their doubts over some of the Commission's intentions, pointing to the positive energy effiency and safety aspects of the use of these gases.
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