About: science-based policy

Carbon neutrality by 2050 makes sense

To stay within the boundaries of the Paris Agreement, Europe needs to accelerate efforts to achieve a carbon neutral future and put climate change at the top of the EU agenda. Frank van der Vloed highlights five key steps that are critical for businesses to make the transition.

Students’ climate strikes: Right goals but wrong words

The students striking are heroes, but their moral arguments need to be further developed if they want to reach new audiences, writes Darrick Evensen.
Agrifood 28-11-2018

Europe’s anti-rationalist future?

European restrictions on gene editing, GMOs and pesticides bans risk undermining scientific progress and innovation if they are not reversed, argues Sir Colin Berry.
Health 04-09-2018

JTI boss: EU Scientific Advisory Mechanism could adjust tobacco directive to reality

The next European Commission should enhance its collaboration with the EU’s Scientific Advisory Mechanism (SAM), which would provide bias-free consultancy and eventually adjust the Tobacco Product Directive to the reality, JTI’s Ramunas Macius said in an interview with EURACTIV.com.  
Climate change 10-07-2018

Ex-IPCC Vice-Chair: EU contribution to Paris goals is ‘unambitious and outdated’

The European Union needs to “significantly improve its policy package” for 2030 in order to align itself with the emission trajectories of the Paris Agreement, according to renowned Belgian climate scientist Jean-Pascal van Ypersele.
Agrifood 25-06-2018

Science, public opinion and policy-making

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The re-authorisation of Monsanto’s weedkiller glyphosate and the ban of three neonicotinoids – a class of insecticide – have opened a heated debate on the role of science in policy-making.

Climate change 01-02-2018

Scientists dismiss ‘geo-engineering’ to stop climate change

“None” of the negative emission technologies currently available – including forest carbon sinks and other geo-engineering techniques – have the potential to deliver CO2 removals at the scale and rate needed to keep global warming below 2°C, European scientists have warned in a new report out today (1 February).

Restoring trust and effectiveness in EU scientific advice

Today, more than ever, EU regulators must ensure that risk management decisions meet public demands for high standards of protection whilst simultaneously stimulating competitiveness and prosperity in Europe. Basing decisions on the best available science is the pre-condition for achieving these goals, argues Dirk Hüdig.
Corn dryer silos
Biofuels 28-06-2017

Biomass and biofuels in the EU: Emotion-based policymaking?

The European Commission’s tinkering on biomass policy effectively promotes oil over economically viable and sustainable biofuels, writes Francis X. Johnson.
Climate change 21-04-2017

EU scientists ‘Trump-et’ need for evidence-based policies

It’s an age-old question: policy-based evidence, or evidence-based policy? While the answer has traditionally been left to policymakers, scientists and their supporters are marching around the world on Saturday 22 April to demand political leaders enact evidence-based policies.
Health 09-02-2017

Commission must take action against endocrine disruptors

Reducing exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals will benefit healthcare systems and economies as a whole, writes Christian Zahn.
Trade & Society 13-09-2016

A plea for science-based standards in TTIP

The EU’s preference for the “precautionary principle” over science-based decision-making is a barrier to transatlantic trade in the meat industry. TTIP and regulatory convergence would benefit both EU and US farmers, argues Barry Carpenter.
[epSos.de/Flickr]

What does an innovation agenda mean for consumers?

Innovation and consumer protection are not opposites. Indeed there is huge potential to use innovation to deliver safer products that benefit consumers, writes Monique Goyens.
Chemicals

The EU’s confused evidence processes for identifying endocrine disruptors

A group of scientists has written to the European Commission to voice concerns about burden of proof and confused evidence requirements to identify and classify endocrine disruptors under the PPP and Biocides Regulations.

Chemicals ‘fitness check’ should improve EU legislation, not water it down

The scope of the European Commission’s Fitness Check on chemicals is limited to a comparison of the “hazard versus risk” approaches in chemicals legislation. This is misguided, writes Dolores Romano, who argues a hazard-based approach can help protect people and the environment while supporting innovation.

Democracy denied: How the Commission keeps people out of lawmaking

With its Better Regulation agenda, the European Commission talks big about making EU decisions more transparent and increasing public participation. But the reality is very different, writes Anaïs Berthier.
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Endocrine disruption: the view of the chemical industry

Endocrine disruption is an important issue of significant public, political and scientific interest. Even though it can give rise to a very emotional debate, policymakers and authorities should deal with endocrine disruptive substances, as with all chemical substances, via a science- and risk-based regulation. Whether a chemical substance can and will cause harm is a fundamental distinction for both authorities and industry in order to effectively protect people and the environment.
Hans-Olaf Henkel from the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party

SOS for science-based EU policy-making

The past few months have not been a triumph for science-based policy making in the EU, writes Hans-Olaf Henkel.

‘Suppressed’ EU report could have banned pesticides worth billions

As many as 31 pesticides with a value running into billions of pounds could have been banned because of potential health risks, if a blocked EU paper on hormone-mimicking chemicals had been acted upon, the Guardian has learned.

Juncker still mulling scientific advice role after Glover’s position axed

The function of Chief Scientific Adviser to the European Commission "has ceased to exist", Anne Glover confirmed yesterday (13 November) but that does not mean the position will not be re-established by the new Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, EURACTIV understands.
[Photo: Shutterstock]

When science meets politics: the EU’s impact assessment review

The European Commission is reviewing its impact assessment guidelines amid accusations that science is becoming increasingly politicised and scientists manipulated by policymakers and powerful interest groups.
Anne Glover at the 20th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, 18-22 June 2012 [Photo: European Biomass Conference and Exhibition / Flickr]

Glover: EU chief scientist should stay in the shadows

Anne Glover, the EU’s Chief Scientific Advisor, has said that her opinions to the European Commission should remain independent from politics and therefore “not transparent” and immune from public scrutiny. The incoming Commission chief, Jean-Claude Juncker, is considering to maintain her position after Barroso leaves, EURACTIV understands.
Anne Glover speaking at the Friends of Europe - EU 2050: Europe's Tech Revolution (Photo: Flickr: OB-Pic 043)

EU twisting facts to fit political agenda, chief scientist says

A big challenge for the next European Commission will be to disconnect its evidence gathering processes from the “political imperative” that’s driving policy proposals, according to Anne Glover, the EU’s chief scientific advisor.

When politics trumps science: The curious case of the EU’s GMO authorisation system

Policy makers generally trust the scientific recommendations of independent EU agencies. But in the GMO area, a vicious circle of lack of approvals and decreased trust in the technology is being perpetuated, leading to a negative precedent of “politics over science”, writes Nathalie Moll.

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