About: Taxonomy

How the EU taxonomy can be the tool for dynamic climate transition

The EU’s “sustainable Taxonomy” has been sometimes portrayed as a binary tool defining which economic activities are sustainable and which ones are not. In fact, it can benefit a wide cross-section of Europe’s economy, writes Nathan Fabian.

EU taxonomy should be led by science to drive sustainable investment

Meeting the climate target requires rapid realignment and mobilisation of finance at a massive scale. To avoid greenwashing, the EU's sustainable finance taxonomy needs to establish screening criteria, rooted in science and linked to the metrics of climate change, writes Peter Sweatman.

EU green finance rules at risk of deviating from science

Some of the draft emission thresholds contained in the EU's sustainable finance taxonomy are not aligned with climate neutrality and deviate from scientific evidence, raising concerns about political and industry pressure, write Tsvetelina Kuzmanova and Sara Dethier.

The EU’s green finance taxonomy: an Orwellian mechanism

The European Commission’s sustainable finance taxonomy bears all the hallmarks of failed governance: opacity, imprecision, and subjectivity with a punitive approach albeit not assumed, writes Daniel Guéguen. In short, it’s an Orwellian mechanism, he argues.

Finance: becoming green while in the red

Money talks, but it also needs to listen: listen to the demand for change for a financial system that takes account of non-financial issues, from climate change to social inclusion, writes Commissioner Mairead McGuinness.
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Energy 22-10-2020

Financing the energy transition should take into account regional differences between Member States

An increased EU’s emission reduction target by 2030 is currently a hotly debated topic in Brussels.  Regardless of whether the target will be 55% or 60%, reaching EU’s ambitious climate change targets requires significant investment outlays. Paweł Strączyński is PGE’s...

Green recovery hinges on the right data

EU policymakers are promoting a green recovery. A public-private agency rating companies’ climate performance would help keep it on track, argue Steven Tebbe and Laurent Babikian.

No industry support without a commitment to cleaner production

While there is strong claimed support for a 'green' recovery from the European Commission, the European Parliament and key member states like Germany, the devil is in the detail, write Doreen Fedrigo and Camille Maury.

Emission thresholds in EU green finance taxonomy are too high. Here’s why

Carbon dioxide emission limits in the EU taxonomy suggested by the technical expert group are too high and will make it virtually impossible to reach EU climate goals for 2030 and 2050, argues a group of Swedish lawmakers.

Climate change in the time of coronavirus: How we can green the ECB

If, like Cicero wrote, the sinews of war are infinite money, let’s make sure the funds are being used for the right battles, write Brook Riley and Peter Sweatman.

Sustainable finance drive can help address EU’s political challenges

Sustainability and inclusivity have correctly been placed as guiding principles for Europe’s finance policy. The next few months – with decisions on the EIB and the start of a new European Commission – will be decisive in order to put those principles into action, write Tom Jess and Sandrine Dixon-Declève.

Human rights and green finance: friends or foes?

Policymakers currently discussing a 'taxonomy' for sustainable finance products at EU level often argue that the proposal already includes social and human rights safeguards. This is not true in the least, warn Eleni Choidas, Lis Cunha and Rachel Owens.